• Painting of Union cannons firing

    Stones River

    National Battlefield Tennessee

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  • Park Tour Road Closed Unitl 8 AM on Saturday September 13, 2014

    The park tour road and visitor center parking lots will be closed until 8 AM while permitted 5K & 10K race passes through the park. Portions of the Old Nashville Highway will be closed as well.

The Battle of Stones River

Major General William S. Rosecrans

Why Stones River?

As 1862 drew to a close, President Abraham Lincoln was desperate for a military victory. His armies were stalled, and the terrible defeat at Fredericksburg spread a pall of defeat across the nation. There was also the Emancipation Proclamation to consider. The nation needed a victory to bolster morale and support the proclamation when it went into effect on January 1, 1863.

The Confederate Army of Tennessee was camped in Murfreesboro, Tennessee only 30 miles away from General William S. Rosecrans’ army in Nashville. General Braxton Bragg chose this area in order to position himself to stop any Union advances towards Chattanooga and to protect the rich farms of Middle Tennessee that were feeding his men.

Union General-In-Chief Henry Halleck telegraphed Rosecrans telling him that, “… the Government demands action, and if you cannot respond to that demand some one else will be tried.”

On December 26, 1862, the Union Army of the Cumberland left Nashville to meet the Confederates. This was the beginning of the Stones River Campaign.

Next Page: The Union Approach

Did You Know?

Prescribed Fire at the Slaughter Pen

Stones River National Battlefield uses prescribed fire to preserve the battlefield landscapes. Fire also helps eliminate invasive exotic plants and encourage the growth of native grass species. More...