• An engineer inspects the running gear of a steam locomotive at Steamtown NHS

    Steamtown

    National Historic Site Pennsylvania

Canadian Pacific 2317

Looking up at the front of Canadian Pacific 2317.  The gray smokebox on the front end is very evident.  A plume of smoke comes from the top of the locomotive.

Canadian Pacific 2317 looms high in this photograph.  Visitors are often surprised at the size of locomotives and railroad cars.  The CP 2317 is considered a medium-sized locomotive - about 450,000 pounds (including the tender).

NPS Photo

Canadian Pacific #2317

Owners: Canadian Pacific Railway, #2317

Builder: Montreal Locomotive Works, June, 1923

The Canadian Pacific #2317 was built in 1923 as a heavy passenger locomotive. It was built as the eighteenth locomotive of the G-3-c series. (On the Canadian Pacific, "G" stood for the 4-6-2 "Pacific"-type locomotive. The "3" means it was the third design of this wheel arrangement, and the "c" means it was the third production run.) Ultimately, it proved a good design and CPR eventually acquired 173 G-3 4-6-2 steam locomotives. (Only two survive.) It remained in operation until 1959 when, after 36 years of service, it was placed in storage.

F. Nelson Blount acquired the locomotive for his Steamtown Foundation. After Blount's death, the Foundation did bring the 2317 back to operation in 1978. It moved -- with the Steamtown collection -- to Scranton, PA, in 1984, and was donated to the National Park Service in 1987.

At the end of the 2009 season, CP 2317 was moved to the Roundhouse for storage, awaiting it's mandatory 1,472-day FRA-mandated inspection at some future time.

Steamtown NHS is not currently operating mainline steam locomotives. We are in the process of a major maintenance and rebuild of our locomotive power fleet. We are currently focusing our attention on our 1929 Baldwin Locomotive Works #26, an 0-6-0 switcher. BLW #26 will be the motive power for our "Scranton Limited" short train rides. This locomotive may also see duty as motive power for an occasional special excursion on a portion of the former Delaware & Hudson Railroad mainline to Carbondale. The next steam locomotive to return to service is expected to be our Boston and Maine #3713, a Lima-built 4-6-2 Pacific-type Superpower locomotive with oversized firebox and superheaters that are able to pull and heat a 14-car passenger train at track speed! This 1937 American-built locomotive is in our collection and being restored in partnership with the Lackawanna and Wyoming Valley Railway Historical Society. When completed, the locomotive will replace our Canadian National #3254 2-8-2 Mikado-type locomotive for mainline excursion power. Following completion of these projects, we plan next to repair and restore 1923 Canadian Pacific #2317 to operating condition. CP #2317 will be used for motive power on our mainline excursions.

We continue to be diligent and proactive in our efforts to secure the resources necessary to restore these historic locomotives to operating condition, and to allow the Park to continue its unique mission of providing "live steam" interpretive programs well into the future. Follow the progress via our website or, better yet, plan a visit to our Locomotive Shops.

 
CP 2317, a black steam locomotive, rolls past a white and green railroad tower in East Stroudsburg, PA.
Canadian Pacific 2317 rolls past the historic switch tower in East Stroudsburg, PA on a cloudy September morning.  The tower controlled the switches (turnouts) in the railroad yard by the passenger station.
NPS Photo, Ken Ganz
 

Click to return to the Operating Locomotives page or the Explore Steamtown's collection page.

Did You Know?

An engineer peers out of the cab of a steam locomotive.  The engineer drives the train, but the conductor is in charge.

The engineer drives the locomotive using the throttle lever, brakes, and reversing gear. He (or she) is in charge of the locomotive. The conductor, however, is in charge of the train. Learn more about railroad jobs at Steamtown NHS in Scranton, Pennsylvania. More...