• An engineer inspects the running gear of a steam locomotive at Steamtown NHS

    Steamtown

    National Historic Site Pennsylvania

Tobyhanna Station Centennial Excursion from Steamtown NHS

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Date: June 19, 2008

            SCRANTON, PA – The Coolbaugh Township Historical Association, the Pocono Chapter of the National Railway Historical Society and the National Park Service will mark the 100th Anniversary of the former Delaware Lackawanna and Western Railroad Station at Tobyhanna on Sunday, June 29, 2008 with The 100th Anniversary Express.

 

Steamtown travelers will take a tour of the historic Mill Pond #1 Ice House, while actors in period clothing will tell of distinct times in the growth of CoolbaughTownship and the village of Tobyhanna. Food will be available and the station and the local VFW will host a chicken barbeque during the extended stay. Music, a parade, antique autos, guest speakers and photo opportunities will add to the cheer of this train’s return to the Pocono Mountains. This is also the debut of Tobyhanna excursions for the 2008 season.

 

Departure time for the 100th Anniversary Express is 11:00 a.m. Arrival at Scranton will be approximately 4:00 p.m. Tickets are $31.00 for adults 17 to 61 years old, $26.00 for 62 and over, and $20.00 for children aged 16-6 years of age which includes entrance to all Museum facilities and scheduled programs. Children under 5 require a ticket at no charge. Reservations can be made by calling 570-340-5204.

 

Located in Scranton, Pennsylvania, Steamtown is open daily from 9:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. From I-81, follow exit 185 (Central Scranton Expressway); then, follow the signs to the main entrance at Lackawanna and Cliff Avenues.  

 

Additional details regarding interpretive and educational programs and activities may be obtained by calling (570) 340-5200 or toll free (888) 693-9391, or by visiting the Steamtown web site at www.nps.gov/stea.

 

Digital images are available for media releases.

 

-NPS-

Did You Know?

USS Olympia

Many railroads, particularly Eastern roads, used anthracite coal for locomotive fuel during the early steam era. During World War I, the US Navy and the Allied Forces used anthracite coal to power the steam boilers of warships such as Admiral Dewey's USS Olympia, which is berthed at the Independence Seaport Museum in Philadelphia. Burning anthracite resulted in low-smoke emissions from steamship boilers and gave the Allies a strategic opportunity to close-in on the enemy in a battle. With anthracite coal diverted to the war effort, locomotive builders adapted to using bituminous coal in their future designs.