• An engineer inspects the running gear of a steam locomotive at Steamtown NHS

    Steamtown

    National Historic Site Pennsylvania

Steamtown NHS to Present Documentary Film, "Ubaldo"

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Date: May 19, 2009

SCRANTON, PA – Steamtown National Historic Site, in partnership with PBS affiliate WVIA TV, will present the film documentary, "Ubaldo," on Sunday, May 24. The 60-minute film will be shown in the Park’s Theater at 10:00 a.m., and 12:30 and 3:00 p.m., and is included in the Park Entrance fee.

 

"Ubaldo" documents a cultural festival more than 800 years old that can be found in only two places in the world - Gubbio, Italy, and Jessup, Pennsylvania. Participating in the festival is a very important experience in the lives of the residents of these sister cities. Their stories create a uniquely intimate bridge between two countries, two cultures and two communities over which they share their past and present, and traditions of physical challenges and personal values.

 

"Ubaldo" is shot entirely on location in Gubbio and Jessup. The film’s narrative follows the experiences of a tour group from Jessup during its visit to Gubbio for the 2006 celebration. The film also tells the story of how this tradition came to the town of Jessup, one of 40 historic communities of the LackawannaHeritageValley. Steamtown NHS partners with the Lackawanna Heritage Valley Authority in presenting northeastern Pennsylvania’s ethnic heritage and anthracite area culture.

 

Located in Scranton, Pennsylvania, Steamtown is open daily from 9:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. From I-81, follow exit 185 (Central Scranton Expressway); then, follow the signs to the main entrance at Lackawanna and Cliff Avenues. Additional details regarding interpretive and educational programs and activities may be obtained by calling (570) 340-5200 or toll free (888) 693-9391, or by visiting the Steamtown web site anytime at www.nps.gov/stea.

 

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Did You Know?

USS Olympia

Many railroads, particularly Eastern roads, used anthracite coal for locomotive fuel during the early steam era. During World War I, the US Navy and the Allied Forces used anthracite coal to power the steam boilers of warships such as Admiral Dewey's USS Olympia, which is berthed at the Independence Seaport Museum in Philadelphia. Burning anthracite resulted in low-smoke emissions from steamship boilers and gave the Allies a strategic opportunity to close-in on the enemy in a battle. With anthracite coal diverted to the war effort, locomotive builders adapted to using bituminous coal in their future designs.