National Park Service

State of the Park Reports

State of the Park Report for John Day Fossil Beds National Monument

Executive Summary

The Painted Hills of John Day Fossil Beds National Park
The Painted Hills of John Day Fossil Beds National Park

The mission of the National Park Service is to preserve unimpaired the natural and cultural resources and values of national parks for the enjoyment, education, and inspiration of this and future generations. NPS Management Policies (2006) state that "The Service will also strive to ensure that park resources and values are passed on to future generations in a condition that is as good as, or better than, the conditions that exist today."

As part of the stewardship of national parks for the American people, the NPS has begun to develop State of the Park reports to assess the overall status and trends of each park's resources. The NPS will use this information to improve park priority setting and to synthesize and communicate complex park condition information to the public in a clear and simple way.

The purpose of this State of the Park report for John Day Fossil Beds National Monument is to:

  1. Provide to visitors and the American public a snapshot of the status and trend in the condition of a park's priority resources and values;
  2. Summarize and communicate complex scientific, scholarly, and park operations factual information and expert opinion using non-technical language and a visual format;
  3. Highlight park stewardship activities and accomplishments to maintain or improve the State of the Park;
  4. Identify key issues and challenges facing the park to help inform park management planning.

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John Day Fossil Beds National Monument, located in east central Oregon in Grant and Wheeler counties, encompasses 14,000 acres in the John Day River valley. The monument features sedimentary rocks that contain a plant and animal fossil record spanning 40 million years of the Age of Mammals. The monument is geographically dispersed over three widely separated units: the Clarno Unit, the Painted Hills Unit, and the Sheep Rock Unit. All three units provide a variety of opportunities for recreation and study and serve to introduce the paleontological story of the much larger basin to the public.

The purpose of John Day Fossil Beds National Monument is to preserve, and provide for the scientific and public understanding of the paleontological resources of the John Day region, and the natural, scenic, and cultural resources within the boundaries of the national monument. While there are other large paleontological sites in North America, including many protected by the National Park Service, the John Day region's diversity of fossil resources and the nearly continuous record of rocks over the last 50 million years are unique (Fremd 2010). There are few other places on Earth, if any, where the past 50 million years is as accessible as it is in the John Day region, for the collection and analysis of both a continuous fossil record and repeated layers of datable volcanic ash. Eight distinct fossil assemblages preserve a great variety of vertebrate, invertebrate, plant, and trace fossils, representing remains of hundreds of species (Dilhoff et al. 2009, Fremd 2010). Dating of volcanic layers provides time constraints on the age of these fossil assemblages, and in some cases the age of a particular fossil can be narrowed down to less than a hundred thousand years, exceptional precision for a fossil record from millions of years ago. Well known ages for each fossil assemblage permit comparisons to other deposits throughout the region and elsewhere in the world, providing a framework to examine evolutionary and environmental changes through time. The rich paleontological and geological records of this region combine to make it one of the best places in the world to study the Earth's history.

Significance statements express why the park unit's resources and values are important enough to warrant national park unit designation. John Day Fossil Beds National Monument is significant because:

  • The John Day region contains one of the longest and most continuous Tertiary records of evolutionary change and biotic relationships in the world; this outstanding fossil record heightens our understanding of earth history. John Day Fossil Beds National Monument contains a concentration of localities that are a major part of that record.
  • The John Day region is one of the few areas on the planet with numerous well-preserved and ecologically diverse fossil biotas that are entombed in sedimentary layers and are found in close proximity with datable volcanic rocks; these biotas span intervals of dramatic worldwide paleoclimatic change.
  • John Day Fossil Beds National Monument contains regionally representative scenic, natural and cultural landscapes—notably, the James Cant Ranch Historic District, which represents the history of sheep ranching in the region.

The list below provides examples of stewardship activities and accomplishments by park staff and partners to maintain or improve the condition of priority park resources and values for this and future generations:

Partnerships

Partnerships with other agencies, tribal organizations, and educational institutions are integral to park management goals. Some examples of successful, ongoing partnerships include:

  • Cooperative management of paleo resources with Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and U.S. Forest Service.
  • Cooperative law enforcement efforts with BLM, Oregon State Police, local sheriff offices.
  • Invasive plant management and strategic planning through collaboration with North Cascades Exotic Plant Management Team, Grant County Cooperative Weed Management Area, Deschutes Native Plant Seed Bank, and USDA Agricultural Research Services (Ecologically-Based Invasive Plant Management planning).
  • Fire management collaboration with BLM and NPS Fire Effects monitoring program (North Cascades team).
  • Oregon Museum of Science and Industry – Hancock Field Station—this 10 acre parcel of private land within the Clarno unit is used for research and educational purposes. A General Agreement authorizes certain OMSI activities on monument lands.
  • Tribal partnerships, including Pine Creek Conservation Area.
  • Summer internship and guest scientist programs with Oregon Youth Conservation Corps, Northwest Youth Corps, Youth Conservation Corps, Student Conservation Association, GeoCorp program.
  • Supporting local community development with Oregon Paleo Lands Institute.

Natural Resources

  • Paleontology: Intensive surveys within the Sheep Rock unit have covered more than 75% of the badlands exposures, and helped to preserve thousands of fossil specimens. New fossil species are regularly discovered in all three park units, and on adjacent BLM lands, by park paleontologists.
  • Two recently published finds includes the earliest modern beaver in North America and the world's oldest fisher; press coverage of these finds created wide-spread general interest.
  • The park hosted two recent field conferences—Society of Vertebrate Paleontology, and Geological Society of America.
  • Recent geologic research has helped define stratigraphy of rock units in the Park, and combined with new radiometric dates allows more precise dating of fossils (usually within 1 million years).
  • Park working with NOAA fisheries to increase threatened steelhead populations by restoring riparian vegetation and improving fish passage in Bridge Creek at the Painted Hills Unit.
  • Collaboration with UCBN Inventory and Monitoring program for long-term monitoring and natural resource management.
    • Radio telemetry study with bat species to determine location of roosts
    • Vertebrate inventories (mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians)
    • Butterfly and moth inventories
    • Upland and riparian vegetation monitoring
    • Water quality and stream channel monitoring
  • Vegetation management program: Annually control invasive plant species through herbicide application (with an average of over 100 acres treated each year), manual pulling, and biological control agents (stem-boring weevil for Dalmatian toadflax).
  • Restoration of abandoned agricultural fields to native grass communities. Initiated ecologically-based invasive plant management (EBIPM) in partnership with USDA-ARS to improve weed management effectiveness and sustainability of the program.

Cultural Resources

  • Completion of the cultural landscape inventory for the Cant Ranch Historic District.
  • Updated National Register of Historic Places nomination for the Cant Ranch Historic District.
  • Preservation of historic fruit tree varieties in the Cant Ranch orchard by grafting scions to period root stock.
  • Preservation treatment of the Cant Ranch outbuildings and landscape.
  • Increased knowledge of archeology through archeological surveys and testing projects including the discovery of pit houses occupied by indigenous tribes.

Visitor Experience

  • Thomas Condon Paleontology Center is a world class facility for educating the public about the region's fossil history and the on-going history of scientific inquiry.
  • Social media—Significant updates to the website have substantially improved public access to information about the monument. The park has established a popular Facebook page, YouTube channel, and Twitter account to increase relevancy for virtual visitors.
  • Major revisions to publications are ongoing. Six publications have already been revised and are now available, with many more on the way.
  • Created a new Jr. Ranger book in 2012 that focuses on the full range of primary and secondary park resources.
  • The popular horse kit traveling educational trunks are sent to schools as far away as Guam.
  • Eight new wayside exhibits were developed and installed at two popular park locations, the Clarno Picnic Area and the Island in Time trail at Blue Basin.
  • Rangers completed a monument-wide wayside exhibit inventory and assessment in 2012.

Park Infrastructure

  • Prep lab and collection facility at Thomas Condon Paleontology Center are state of the art, allowing curation of park resources at a level unprecedented within the National Park Service.
  • Energy efficiency: New residences were constructed at Painted Hills and Foree in 2009 and 2010. The Painted Hills house is a net-zero energy home that actually results in an annual surplus back to the park's energy bill.
  • The Red Scar Knoll trail was built at Painted Hills in 2011, providing a spectacular and popular visitor experience.

Strategic Sustainability

The greatest management challenge at John Day Fossil Beds, as at many other parks, is development of a strategic management paradigm that will be sustainable into the future. We need to become lean and efficient with a focus on the core resources for which the park was established. This is going to require some very difficult choices between important resources and core resources. This will likely mean a conscious decision to let some important, but not core, resources and assets deteriorate.

A related significant challenge is maintaining employee skills and workplace satisfaction in the face of declining budgets, FTE ceilings and the need to do less with less, which is not easy for highly dedicated employees to accept. A significant portion of the long-term workforce at John Day Fossil Beds will be eligible for retirement within the next several years, so planning for workforce transition will be important to retain institutional knowledge.

Lands Issues

John Day Fossil Beds National Monument was established in 1975. As described in the park's Land Protection Plan, nearly one quarter of the area within the boundary is in non-federal ownership and much of this non-federal land is privately owned. Associated threats to park resources and visitor experience include trespass cattle, exotic plant control, access to NPS facilities and resources across inholdings, and encroachment of development on park lands.

Community/Partnerships

In the modern world, no park is an island. To effectively manage park resources and provide a quality experience for park visitors, John Day Fossil Beds National Monument needs to maintain multiple existing partnerships and seek to develop new partners in innovative, non-traditional ways.

The park and our visitors contribute positively to local economies; continued economic development in rural communities surrounding the park is important to provide necessary infrastructure for visitors to stay in the area long enough to experience the park's resources, as well as for support of NPS employees and management functions. We are part of the local communities and economies, and cooperation with local efforts to expand necessary visitor services is appropriate.

Paleontology

John Day Fossil Beds National Monument was established because of world-class fossil resources. The park has an active and exciting paleontology program with new species being described on an almost routine basis. This program is world renowned and very well-respected. Since scientific integrity of paleontological resources is lost if the specimens erode out of their geologic context, the park routinely prospects for new fossils becoming exposed through erosion. As a result, the park's museum collection is literally expanding every week. At some point, the park's capacity for curating these specimens will be reached. Pre-planning for this eventuality will be important for continued protection of these world-class resources.

The 2009 General Management Plan plans for opening the Hancock Mammal Quarry for research and interpretation. This site is of great importance to scientists' knowledge of vertebrate fossils from the early Tertiary Period. Preliminary analysis suggests that this is the best late Eocene vertebrate site found in the western United States. Much information likely would be gained by reopening the quarry, and it would add a new facet to the visitor experience. However, significant pre-planning and facility development would be necessary to insure that this important resource could be adequately protected and interpreted.

Vegetation Management

Decisions regarding sustainable management of vegetative communities within John Day Fossil Beds National Monument will be important in the future, possibly necessitating re-evaluation of desired future conditions and perhaps even applicability of traditional NPS policy regarding native communities. Invasive plant species are widespread and expanding within all three units, posing a significant threat to native communities. Even if the entire park budget and all staff were to be dedicated solely to exotic plant management, invasive plants could not be eradicated. The park is working on an innovative planning process to establish realistic priorities and goals for treatment of exotic plants; however this will continue to be a huge management challenge for the foreseeable future.

Although junipers are native to the monument, scientists believe that this species is encroaching on new areas and in densities that may require some management action (Miller et al. 2005). Prescribed fire has been used over the past few decades to control junipers, but there is disagreement over the application of burning because of the aggressive establishment of exotic understory species in areas opened up by fire.

Cultural Resources

The Cant Ranch Historic District is one of the most intact locally significant examples of a historic sheep/cattle ranch in Wheeler and Grant Counties, Oregon, and is currently managed to maintain the historic features. This includes multiple historic structures including four agricultural fields actively managed for harvest. Sustainable management of this district into the future may become increasingly difficult as budgets and staffing declines.

A management plan for the park's archeological resources, especially pictographs, is a critical need to protect these irreplaceable resources. In 2013 meetings with each of the traditionally associated American Indian governments, the need for a formal plan to manage and protect pictographs was raised as the tribes' highest priority. The park lacks technical expertise to complete this planning process and will require assistance from Pacific West Region staff to do so. Timely completion of this planning process is important for resource protection and for maintaining good relations with traditionally associated tribal governments.

Visitor Opportunities and Relevancy

First-time visitors to the park often exclaim in awe that they had no idea there is such a fascinating resource right here in Oregon and declare that they will be back to visit again now that they know about the amazing paleontology story. This park is quite remote. Digital infrastructure that has become expected elsewhere is not available here. We do not have cell phone coverage in most of the park or the surrounding areas. Internet infrastructure capabilities are limited. Even telephones often malfunction. Although the park has an active following on Facebook and Twitter, as well as two web cameras, finding a way to provide digital experiences that the modern visitor (both on-site and virtual visitors) expect continues to be challenging.

The Clarno Unit is the least developed of the park's units. There is an extensive trail system that was informally created over time rather than planned. The park's 2009 General Management Plan calls for formalizing these unofficial trails. Careful planning and development could result in a much expanded visitor experience, including new interpretive opportunities.

Summary Table

The summary table, below, and the supporting information that follows, provide an overall assessment of the condition of priority resources and values at John Day Fossil Beds National Monument based on scientific and scholarly studies and expert opinion. Reference conditions that represent "healthy" ecosystem parameters (currently derived from our understanding of historic conditions), and regulatory standards (such as those related to air or water quality) provide the rationale to describe current resource status. In coming years, rapidly evolving information regarding climate change and associated effects will inform our goals for managing park resources, and may alter how we describe the trend in condition of park resources. Thus, reference conditions, regulatory standards, and our judgment about resource status or trend may evolve as the rate of climate change accelerates and we respond to novel conditions. In this context, the status and trends documented here provide a useful point-in-time baseline to inform our understanding of emerging change, as well as a synthesis to share as we build broader climate change response strategies with partners.

The Status and Trend symbols used in the summary table below and throughout this report are summarized in the following key. The background color represents the current condition status, the direction of the arrow summarizes the trend in condition, and the thickness of the outside line represents the degree of confidence in the assessment. In some cases, the arrow is omitted because data are not sufficient for calculating a trend (e.g., data from a one-time inventory or insufficient sample size).

Condition Status Trend in Condition Confidence in
Assessment
Condition of resource warrants significant concern Warrants Significant Concern Condition is improving Condition is Improving High confidence in the assessment High
Condition of resource warrants moderate concern Warrants Moderate Concern Condition is unchanging Condition is Unchanging Medium confidence in the assessment Medium
Resource is in good condition Resource is in Good Condition Condition is deteriorating Condition is Deteriorating Low confidence in the assessment Low

Examples of how the symbols should be interpreted:

Resource is in good condition; condition is improving; high confidence in the assessment. Resource is in good condition; condition is improving; high confidence in the assessment.
Condition of resource warrants moderate concern; condition is unchanging; medium confidence in the assessment. Condition of resource warrants moderate concern; condition is unchanging; medium confidence in the assessment.
Condition of resource warrants significant concern; trend in condition is unknown or not applicable; low confidence in the assessment. Condition of resource warrants significant concern; trend in condition is unknown or not applicable; low confidence in the assessment.
Priority Resource or Value Condition Status/Trend Rationale
Natural Resources
Climate Condition of resource warrants moderate concern; condition is deteriorating; medium confidence in the assessment. Temperature, precipitation, and related climate variables are key drivers of natural resource conditions and influence cultural resources, visitor experience and park infrastructure. During the last several decades mean annual temperatures have increased, particularly during winter, causing declining snowpack. The region has experienced acute drought conditions during much of the last decade. This trend of aridification is expected to continue during the next several decades. Learn more »
Air Quality Condition of resource warrants moderate concern; trend in condition is unknown or not applicable; medium confidence in the assessment. Although the park is in a rural area remote from most sources of air pollution, estimated ozone, average visibility, and nitrogen wet deposition levels in the park for 2005–2009 warrant moderate concern based on NPS Air Resource Division benchmarks. Relatively distant pollution sources affect the entire region. Air quality is in good condition for estimated sulfur wet deposition for 2005–2009. Learn more »
Paleontological Resources Resource is in good condition; condition is improving; high confidence in the assessment. Ongoing paleontological research has substantially improved knowledge of the monument's resources. Many new species have been discovered and there are now more accurate reconstructions of past ecosystems and better understanding of how plant and animal communities changed through time. Sites are closely monitored and paleontological resources are protected through active management. Learn more »
Geologic Resources Resource is in good condition; condition is improving; high confidence in the assessment. Research in geology has improved knowledge of the monument's resources in recent years, yielding new radiometric dates and more detailed stratigraphy. Updated geologic maps and a Geologic Resources Inventory report are in progress. Exceptional geologic features are stable and rates of erosion are relatively constant. Learn more »
Water Quality Condition of resource warrants moderate concern; trend in condition is unknown or not applicable; high confidence in the assessment. Elevated water temperatures pose a threat to cool water species. In addition, benthic macroinvertebrate samples indicate somewhat impaired conditions in the John Day River. Learn more »
River Channel Condition of resource warrants moderate concern; trend in condition is unknown or not applicable; low confidence in the assessment. Data collected in 2010 represents the first stream channel assessment of the John Day River. All data is baseline information to which future assessments can be compared. Initial data did not indicate severe resource issues. Learn more »
Vegetation Communities Condition of resource warrants moderate concern; trend in condition is unknown or not applicable; medium confidence in the assessment. The health of native plant communities in both the uplands and riparian zones is declining due to accelerated rates of fire disturbance and weed invasion. Drought is also a likely factor influencing these patterns. Past land use also continues to influence contemporary conditions. Healthy stands of native perennial bunchgrass steppe vegetation are increasingly rare across the Monument, replaced instead by non-native invasive annual grasses. Likewise, non-native weedy vegetation dominates most riparian communities. Learn more »
Terrestrial Invasive and Nuisance Species Condition of resource warrants significant concern; condition is deteriorating; high confidence in the assessment. Cheatgrass is found throughout the Monument and medusahead is rapidly expanding. Other non-native grasses such as Japanese brome and non-native forbs such as Dalmatian toadflax are also widespread. In riparian areas, reed canarygrass commonly forms monocultures. Learn more »
Aquatic Invasive and Nuisance Species Condition of resource warrants moderate concern; condition is deteriorating; medium confidence in the assessment. The presence and expansion of the invasive rusty crayfish population is a threat to native aquatic species. The status and trend of other potential aquatic invasive and nuisance species within the Monument is not known. Learn more »
Species of Management Concern Resource is in good condition; trend in condition is unknown or not applicable; medium confidence in the assessment. The Monument is home to a diversity of unique plants and animals, including the yellow-flowering endemic John Day Chaenactis which contributes to the spring wildflower bloom at Painted Hills. Other unique species include the rare spotted bat and the western whiptail lizard. According to inventories conducted in 2002–2006, populations of these plants and animals appear stable, although no recent surveys have been conducted. Some caution is warranted due to the extent of degraded vegetation habitat conditions. Learn more »
Dark Night Sky Resource is in good condition; condition is unchanging; high confidence in the assessment. Due to the remote location of the park, the effects of population growth in large but distant urban centers will have a minimal effect on night sky quality resulting in an unchanging trend. Learn more »
Soundscape/Viewscape Resource is in good condition; trend in condition is unknown or not applicable; medium confidence in the assessment. Unique geologic formations in a rainbow of colors highlight each of the three park units where wildlife abounds. The peacefulness of the region is only broken by highway traffic and the occasional military aircraft overflights. Structures and activities on private lands within the park boundary impact viewsheds. Learn more »
Cultural Resources
Archeological Resources Condition of resource warrants moderate concern; condition is unchanging; high confidence in the assessment. Most of the value of archaeological remains preserved in the John Day Fossil Beds National Monument resides in its capacity to provide meaningful information regarding long-term human processes and existence in the central John Day/Blue Mountain region. There are at least six different types of sites represented in the three units of JODA, the primary material identified in sites are stone tools and manufacturing waste. Pictographs are also present within the monument and hold significance to contemporary Tribes. The overall condition status for this resource is moderate concern due mainly to the ad hoc nature in which work is completed and the emphasis on inventory versus all other types of archaeological activity. Because of the sporadic nature of this work, a trend could not be identified. Learn more »
Cultural Anthropology Condition of resource warrants significant concern; trend in condition is unknown or not applicable; high confidence in the assessment. Affiliation studies have reliably identified three Tribes with a historical interest in the John Day area. The Umatilla, Warm Springs and Burns Paiute all express an interest in the activities supported by the National Park Service. Consultation with the Tribes is improving but needed studies, particularly traditional land-use studies, have not been undertaken. Learn more »
Cultural Landscapes Resource is in good condition; condition is unchanging; high confidence in the assessment. The cultural landscape inventory was completed in 2009 and determined that the contributing landscape structures and features were in good condition with, "…few signs of major negative disturbance and deterioration." Some features, like the Titanic Ditch and the orchards, were noted in fair and poor condition, but treatments have been completed since 2009 to improve their conditions. Learn more »
Historic Structures Resource is in good condition; condition is unchanging; high confidence in the assessment. Of the 19 historic structures at the Cant Ranch Historic District, all were found to be in good condition during the last assessment (2009). Preservation treatment continues on an as needed basis to maintain the structures in good condition. Learn more »
History Resource is in good condition; condition is unchanging; high confidence in the assessment. Baseline documents for park history (Administrative History and Historic Resource Study) have been completed. The importance and role John Day Fossil Beds played in the early fossil prospecting and interpretations is fundamental to the establishment of the park. Learn more »
Museum Collections Resource is in good condition; condition is unchanging; high confidence in the assessment. The park's museum collections are in stable condition due in large part to object housing that is appropriate for the items being stored and the exceptional quality of the repository at the Thomas Condon Paleontology Center, which exceeds the current museum facility standards. The frequent use and responsible tracking of objects also contributes to the overall good condition of assemblages. Learn more »
Visitor Experience
Visitor Numbers Resource is in good condition; condition is improving; high confidence in the assessment. The total of 148,152 visitors to the park in 2012 is higher than that of 2010 (135,151) and 2011 (148,002) and also higher than the 10-year average of 123,614 visitors for 2002–2011. Learn more »
Visitor Satisfaction Resource is in good condition; condition is improving; high confidence in the assessment. Based on the standard visitor satisfaction survey conducted each year, the percentage of visitors satisfied in FY12 was 100.0%, which is higher than the average for the previous five years (97.8%) and ten years (95.1%). Learn more »
Interpretive and Education Programs - Talks, Tours, and Special Events Resource is in good condition; condition is improving; high confidence in the assessment. The monument continues to improve and expand the variety and quality of interpretive programming targeting 21st century audience needs and incorporating new paleontological discoveries and concepts, while also increasing cultural interpretation. Learn more »
Interpretive Media - Brochures, Exhibits, Signs, and Website Condition of resource warrants moderate concern; condition is unchanging; high confidence in the assessment. Replacement of outdated media is not keeping up with the shelf life of existing media. Plans and funding requests are being developed to address these needs. Learn more »
Sense of Place Resource is in good condition; trend in condition is unknown or not applicable; medium confidence in the assessment. Historic buildings, corrals, and farm implements are set within a beautiful expanse of green, fertile land. One can view the pastoral setting and feel the sense of a busy, hard-working ranch. The combination of the well preserved ranch and surrounding landscape defines this historical place. Outside the historic ranch, the rugged and exposed landscapes give visitors a sense of the vast paleohistory of life on earth and a connection to the story of early scientific expeditions to the area. Learn more »
Accessibility Condition of resource warrants significant concern; condition is unchanging; low confidence in the assessment. Accessibility improvements have been identified as a priority. The park is pursuing funding to improve accessibility for all visitors. Learn more »
Safety Resource is in good condition; condition is unchanging; high confidence in the assessment. Safety of employees and visitors is a park priority. No recordable visitor incidents have occurred in the past several years. The park's safety committee is active, meeting once a month. More than a dozen new Job Hazard Analyses (JHAs) have been prepared in the last year. An Operational Leadership course has been scheduled for 2013. Learn more »
Partnerships Resource is in good condition; condition is improving; high confidence in the assessment. John Day Fossil Beds cultivates numerous important formal and informal partnerships to accomplish park goals. Most notably, formal partnerships with BLM are vital to protection of park resources and visitors; we share responsibilities for paleontology, museum collections, archeology, and law enforcement. Learn more »
Park Infrastructure
Overall Facility Condition Index Resource is in good condition; condition is improving; high confidence in the assessment. The 140 assets at John Day Fossil Beds National Monument have an overall FCI of 0.037, which is Good based on industry and NPS standards. FCI is the cost of repairing an asset, such as a building, road, trail, or water system, divided by the cost of replacing it. Learn more »
Energy Consumption Resource is in good condition; condition is unchanging; high confidence in the assessment. Energy usage (BTUs per gross square footage of buildings) at the park in 2012 was 3.3 % higher than the average for the previous 4 years. Learn more »
Park Carbon Footprint Resource is in good condition; condition is unchanging; high confidence in the assessment. John Day Fossil Beds NM belongs to a network of parks nationwide that are putting climate friendly behavior at the forefront of sustainability planning. The Park's climate action plan describes commitments to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases at the park by 2016. Combined emissions from park and concessioner operations and visitor activities within the Park during the 2007 baseline year were roughly equivalent to the emissions from the energy use of 12 households each year. Learn more »

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