National Park Service
Big Hole National Battlefield Cabrillo National Monument Catoctin Mountain Park John Day Fossil Beds National Monument Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield Park Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park Mississippi National River and Recreation Area Ocmulgee National Monument Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument Salem Maritime National Historic Site Saugus Iron Works National Historic Site

State of the Park Reports

About State of the Park Reports


Completed State of the Park Reports



The mission of the National Park Service is to preserve unimpaired the natural and cultural resources and values of national parks for the enjoyment, education, and inspiration of this and future generations. NPS Management Policies (2006) state that "The Service will also strive to ensure that park resources and values are passed on to future generations in a condition that is as good as, or better than, the conditions that exist today."

The purpose of these State of the Park reports is to:

  1. Provide to visitors and the American public a snapshot of the status and trend in the condition of a park's priority resources and values;
  2. Summarize and communicate complex scientific, scholarly, and park operations factual information and expert opinion using non-technical language and a visual format;
  3. Highlight park stewardship activities and accomplishments to maintain or improve the State of the Park;
  4. Identify key issues and challenges facing the park to help inform park management planning.


Featured Information

A Call to Action

Report cover for Big Hole National Battlefield

A Call to Action rallies National Park Service employees and partners to advance a shared vision toward 2016. It describes specific goals and measurable actions that chart a new direction for the National Park Service as it enters its second century.

Launched on August 25, 2011, the 95th birthday of the Service, A Call to Action was updated the following year to reflect accomplished work and new actions. Learn more...

Big Hole National Battlefield

Report cover for Big Hole National Battlefield

Big Hole National Battlefield was the site of a battle on August 9–10, 1877 between the U.S. Army with Montana citizen volunteers and the Nez Perce people.

The battle was a key event within a five-month conflict in which the army, intent on moving the Nez Perce to the Lapwai Reservation in Idaho, pursued roughly 750 men, women, and children across 1,170 miles from the Wallowa Valley in Oregon to the Bear Paw Mountains.
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Cabrillo National Monument

Report cover for Cabrillo National Monument

Cabrillo National Monument commemorates Juan Rodriguez Cabrillo's 1542 voyage of exploration. Located at the southern tip of the Point Loma Peninsula, Cabrillo NM is an effective island of rare habitats that is isolated from other natural lands by the ocean, San Diego Bay, and urbanization. The park is known for its Old Point Loma Lighthouse, one of the first eight lighthouses built along the west coast by the U.S. government in the 1850s. Learn more...

Catoctin Mountain Park

Report cover for Catoctin Mountain Park

Catoctin Mountain Park encompasses 5,770 acres of forested landscape located in the mountains of the Catoctin Ridge in north-central Maryland. The park area has witnessed Native American use, European settlement for subsistence and commercial farming, iron production and other industry, tourism, recreational hunting, and military usage (both during the Civil War and World War II). Catoctin Mountain Park provides quality recreational opportunities and serves as a setting and buffer for the Presidential Retreat, while protecting and conserving the park's natural and cultural environments as envisioned by New Deal conservation programs. Learn more...

John Day Fossil Beds National Monument

Report cover for John Day Fossil Beds National Monument

John Day Fossil Beds National Monument, located in east central Oregon in Grant and Wheeler counties, encompasses 14,000 acres in the John Day River valley. The monument features sedimentary rocks that contain a plant and animal fossil record spanning 40 million years of the Age of Mammals. The monument is geographically dispersed over three widely separated units: the Clarno Unit, the Painted Hills Unit, and the Sheep Rock Unit. All three units provide a variety of opportunities for recreation and study and serve to introduce the paleontological story of the much larger basin to the public. Learn more...

Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield Park

Report cover for Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield Park

Between June 19 and July 2, 1864, a series of battles occurred here between Gen. Joseph E. Johnston's Confederate force of 65,000 troops and Gen. William T. Sherman's Union army of 100,000 men. Eventually, Sherman's army outflanked the Confederate force and forced them to abandon their lines. The loss of Kennesaw Mountain removed one of the last major geographic obstacles protecting Atlanta, which eventually fell to the Union army in September of 1864. The fall of Atlanta bolstered the Union army's resolve to continue the conflict and eventually led to the re-election of Abraham Lincoln as president in 1864. Learn more...

Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park

Report cover for Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park

"Gold!" is what the headlines read in 1897, starting the Klondike Gold Rush. Thousands, hoping to ease the woes of economic depression, sold farms, dropped businesses, and boarded ships to follow their dreams north. Today, Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park (KLGO) commemorates the bravery of the stampeders who voyaged north by protecting the trails, historic boomtowns and buildings of the Klondike Gold Rush era.
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Mississippi National River and Recreation Area

Report cover for Mississippi NRRA

The Mississippi NRRA is a 72-mile river segment of America's greatest rivers and is the only National Park about the Mississippi River. The Mississippi is one of the most complex ecosystems on the planet. The Mississippi Flyway serves as a route for 40% of the migratory waterbirds, nearly half of North America's bird species, and is essential to the ecological health of the entire continent. The river environment is home to a rich array of fish, wildlife, and plants. Millions of people live on and near the river, drink its water and rely upon the river's resources. Learn more...

Ocmulgee National Monument

Report cover for Ocmulgee National Monument

Ocmulgee National Monument preserves evidence of one of the longest periods of human habitation at any one site in the National Park System. Occupation is illustrated by prehistoric earthen mounds, including the only known spiral mound in the country; a restored ceremonial earth lodge with original clay floor; prehistoric trenches; an early colonial trading post; and Civil War earthworks.
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Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument

Report cover for Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument

Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument is one of the most biologically diverse protected areas in the Sonoran Desert Region of North America, providing habitat for a wide variety of desert adapted plants and animals, including numerous threatened and endangered species. Visitors to Organ Pipe's Wilderness can experience primitive recreation, expansive vistas, natural night skies, remote solitude and spiritual replenishment in a Sonoran Desert setting.
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Salem Maritime National Historic Site

Report cover for Salem Maritime National Historic Site

Salem Maritime, the first national historic site in the National Park System, was established to preserve and interpret the maritime history of New England and the United States. The site consists of about 9 acres of land and 12 historic structures along the waterfront in Salem, Massachusetts, as well as a visitor center in downtown Salem. The site documents the development of the Atlantic triangular trade during the colonial period, the role of privateering during the Revolutionary War, and the international maritime trade, especially with the Far East, which established American economic independence after the Revolution.
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Saugus Iron Works National Historic Site

Report cover for Saugus Iron Works National Historic Site

Saugus lron Works is a reconstruction of the first successful, integrated iron works in the New World. It produced wrought iron and cast iron products from 1646 to approximately 1670, utilizing the most advanced iron making technology in early Colonial times. On April 5th, 1968 the site was renamed Saugus Iron Works National Historic Site and became part of the National Park System because of its significance to the character, development and history of the United States.
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Last Updated: February 24, 2014 Contact Webmaster