Cultural History Programs

Traditional Cooking with a Bentwood Box

Grade Level: 2-12

Season: Year-round

At home tonight, when you turn on your stove or use your microwave to cook dinner, it's easy to forget how convenient our modern world is. Historically cooking in southeast Alaska was much different. Learn about the traditional techniques of cooking with a bentwood box, and how bentwood boxes are constructed.


Traditional Fire-Starting

Grade Level: 2-12

Season: Year-round

If you didn't have access to matches or a lighter, could you start a fire? Traditionally the Tlingit people used the natural resources around them to create fire, cook their food and stay warm. Visit the park to try your hand at these fire-starting techniques.


Animal Identification in Formline Art

Grade Level: Pre-4

Year-round

Have you ever walked through Sitka National Historical Park and wondered what a certain figure carved into one of the park's totem poles is? Could that be a bear or a wolf? Is that figure a raven or an eagle? Learn to identify these formline characters and gain a greater understanding of the meanings behind these figures by bringing your students to the park to stand in the shadows of these towering totems.


The Russian Bishop's House Tour

Grade Level: K-12

Season: Year-round

Travel back in time by taking a tour of the historic 1843 Russian Bishop's House. While visiting the house, students will learn about the rich history of the Russian exploration and colonization of Alaska, the cultural interactions between the Native Tlingit and Russian settlers, and how the Russian Orthodox Church had a large impact on the city and people of Sitka.

Results

Showing results 1-9 of 9

  • Sitka National Historical Park

    A Day in the Life of Bob the Banana Slug

    A Day in the Life of Bob the Banana Slug

    The slimy and slithery banana slug is a critical member of the temperate rain forest ecosystem. Schedule a time to bring your students to the park to view a banana slug and learn about their important role within southeast Alaska.

  • Sitka National Historical Park

    Animal Identification in Formline Art

    Animal Identification in Formline Art

    Have you ever walked through Sitka National Historical Park and wondered what a certain figure carved into one of the park's totem poles is? Could that be a bear or a wolf? Is that figure a raven or an eagle? Learn to identify these formline characters and gain a greater understanding of the meanings behind these figures by bringing your students to the park to stand in the shadows of these towering totems.

  • Sitka National Historical Park

    Mystery in the Trees

    Mystery in the Trees

    There is a mystery that needs to be solved in Sitka National Historical Park, and your students are needed to get to the bottom of this caper. Students will use their detective skills to investigate four “suspects” and act as judge and jury to determine if there is a guilty suspect or not. Give your students the opportunity to gain a better understanding of the role wildlife and humans play in protected places like national parks.

  • Sitka National Historical Park

    Russian Bishop's House Tour

    Russian Bishop's House Tour

    Travel back in time by taking a tour of the historic 1843 Russian Bishop's House. While visiting the house, students will learn about the rich history of the Russian exploration and colonization of Alaska, the cultural interactions between the Native Tlingit and Russian settlers and how the Russian Orthodox Church had a large impact on the city and people of Sitka.

  • Sitka National Historical Park

    Sea Week

    Sea Week

    What lies underneath the stones and within the tidal pools that remain once the water has retreated from the shoreline? During Sea Week, students will learn about the diverse flora and fauna of the intertidal zone as well as how humans can protect this environment by practicing good intertidal ethics.

  • Sitka National Historical Park

    Skins and Skulls

    Skins and Skulls

    Sea otters, Harbor seals and bears oh my! The fauna of southeast Alaska has adapted to its environment in many different ways. Set up a field trip to learn about these adaptations and to gain a better understanding of how these animals are able to survive in the wilds of Alaska.

  • Sitka National Historical Park

    The Salmon of the Indian River

    The Salmon of the Indian River

    Witness the epic last act of the drama that is the pink salmon life cycle. During the fall, pink salmon that emerged from their eggs in the Indian River just a mere two years earlier will return. After beating the odds, these salmon will attempt to pass on their genes to the next generation. Witness this event, and participate in a set of interactive activities that teach students about the life cycle of the pink salmon.

  • Sitka National Historical Park

    Traditional Cooking with a Bentwood Box

    Traditional Cooking with a Bentwood Box

    At home tonight, when you turn on your stove or use your microwave to cook dinner, it's easy to forget how convenient our modern world is. Historically cooking in southeast Alaska was much different. Learn about the traditional techniques of cooking with a bentwood box, and how bentwood boxes are constructed.

  • Sitka National Historical Park

    Traditional Fire-Starting

    Traditional Fire-Starting

    If you didn't have access to matches or a lighter, could you start a fire? Traditionally the Tlingit people used the natural resources around them to create fire, cook their food and stay warm. Visit the park to try your hand at these fire-starting techniques.