• Sitka National Historical Park Visitor Center Mountains

    Sitka

    National Historical Park Alaska

Sitka Centennial Celebration

Sitka National Historical Park's 100th Anniversary
 
Designated Sitka National Monument on March 23, 1910, Sitka is the oldest park in Alaska, and among the oldest in the United States.

In 2010, as the park celebrates its 100 year anniversary, an entire year of celebrations are on tap. March 20 - 23, 2010, marks the beginning of these events. You can use this webpage to learn more about each month of the celebration, and about the park itself. Sitka is a special place, and we hope you'll be able to attend one or more of these events and learn, or remind yourself, of what this park means to you.

Jump to:

Schedule of events
Our partners
More history of Sitka
Contact the anniversary planners
 

Schedule of Events

Click on each month below to learn more details about planned events


May 15, 2011
Centennial Totem Pole Raising


August 18-22, 2010
2010 Conference on Russian America


June 16-20, 2010
Alutiiq-Tlingit Cultural Sharing


April, 2010
E.W. Merrill photograph exhibit


March 20-23, 2010

Click here to hear a report about the April celebration from National Public Radio affiliate KCAW-FM "Raven Radio" of Sitka, Alaska




 
Our Partners

A number of fantastic organizations will partner with Sitka National Historical Park for the centennial celebrations.

Sheldon Jackson Museum
Sitka Historical Society and Museum
Sitka Maritime Heritage Society
Sitka Tribe of Alaska
Sitka Cultural Center (formerly Southeast Alaska Indian Cultural Center)
St. Michael's Cathedral
Sitka Convention and Visitor's Bureau
City and Borough of Sitka
Kettleson Memorial Library
Alaska State Parks
Alaska State Museums
Alaska Geographic
 
Contact Us

If you have questions concerning the upcoming centennial celebration, or wish to communicate with the park planners for this event, we encourage you to contact us:

email

phone:

(907) 747-0128
(907) 747-0129

Did You Know?

Painting of Tlingit warriors

The Battle of 1804 marked the beginning of Russian governance in Alaska. All that remains of this last major conflict between Europeans and Alaska Natives is a clearing at the site of the Tlingit fort and battlefield.