• Visitors bask in a golden sunset at Dickey Ridge Visitor Center in Shenandoah National Park

    Shenandoah

    National Park Virginia

Shenandoah National Park Seeks Input for Foundation Document

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Date: March 14, 2014

The National Park Service (NPS) has begun the process of preparing a Foundation Document for planning and management of Shenandoah National Park. A Foundation Document involves revisiting the park's core purpose and significance, most important resources and values, and the interpretive themes that tell Shenandoah's important stories.

The Foundation Document is not a decision-making document and does not include actions or management strategies. It describes a shared understanding of what is most important about the park. In this capacity, the Foundation Document will reestablish the underlying guidance for future management and planning decisions for Shenandoah National Park. Because many of the park's original planning documents are out of date, preparing the Foundation Document is the first step for considering Shenandoah's future planning and study needs.

"This Foundation Planning process gives us an outstanding opportunity, prior to the National Park Service Centennial in 2016, to engage our communities, partners, and staff in a dialogue about what makes Shenandoah such a special place, the challenges we face, and the stories we should tell," Shenandoah Superintendent Jim Northup said. "We appreciate very much the public sharing with us their vision of the park as we begin this important work."

The National Park Service invites the public to play a role in charting the park's future by sharing your thoughts on what is most important about Shenandoah National Park, and to help identify its most pressing threats and its greatest opportunities. Park staff will take the thoughts and feedback into consideration as they prepare the Foundation Document.

To submit feedback, go to http://parkplanning.nps.gov/shen by April 4, 2014.

Did You Know?

A brown trail weaves through the woods, passing a rocky outcrop along the way.

Shenandoah National Park has over 500 miles of trails. Over 30% of the trails are in designated wilderness. 101 miles are part of the Appalachian Trail.