• Visitors bask in a golden sunset at Dickey Ridge Visitor Center in Shenandoah National Park

    Shenandoah

    National Park Virginia

Shenandoah National Park Continues Neighbor Appreciation Day 2013

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Date: May 31, 2013

Shenandoah National Park Superintendent Jim Northup is inviting community neighbors to enjoy a day in the park as a part of Shenandoah Neighbors' Day. On June 15, 2013, the park will waive entrance fees for those residents living in counties bordering the park including: Albemarle, Augusta, Greene, Madison, Nelson, Page, Rappahannock, Rockingham and Warren. Shenandoah Neighbors' Day is an annual event held on the third Saturday of each June.

Superintendent Northup said, "Shenandoah National Park provides a nearly $74 million economic benefit to our neighbors, but it is certainly much more.National Parks are also part of the larger fabric of our communities, providing recreation and health benefits. We want to celebrate our adjacent communities and encourage our neighbors to experience these benefits by waiving entrance fees. We hope many neighbors will take advantage of the activities offered in the park during Shenandoah Neighbors' Day."

Shenandoah National Park's partners DNC Parks and Resorts at Shenandoah, Inc. and the Shenandoah National Park Association plan to welcome park neighbors by providing residents of the nine counties with discounts. DNC, the park's official concessioner, plans to provide a 10% discount on select items in their retail stores and a 10% discount on food and some beverage items at all their restaurants. The Shenandoah National Park Association, which supports the interpretive and educational activities of Shenandoah National Park, will offer a 20% discount on all items in their bookstores located in the Dickey Ridge and Byrd Visitor Centers.

Visitors wishing to take advantage of these discounts will be required to show proof of residency by showing their Virginia driver's license.

Did You Know?

Herbert and Lou Henry Hoover sitting on the porch of the Brown House at Rapidan Camp in Shenandoah National Park.

In 1928, wanting to escape the heat and humidity of summers in Washington, D.C., Herbert and Lou Henry Hoover began looking for a "summer place" within a day's drive of the city. The Hoovers acquired land within the proposed Shenandoah National Park and built Rapidan Camp, their summer White House.