• Visitors bask in a golden sunset at Dickey Ridge Visitor Center in Shenandoah National Park

    Shenandoah

    National Park Virginia

Park to Begin 2012 Winter Operations Schedule

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Date: October 19, 2012

Shorter days and cooler nights signal the end of the autumn travel season and the closing of facilities at Shenandoah National Park. Superintendent Martha Bogle announced today that facilities will begin closing at the end of October.

Dickey Ridge and Harry F. Byrd Visitor Centers will close on November 25.

Campgrounds will operate on the following schedule: Mathews Arm and Loft Mountain Campgrounds will close on October 28; Lewis Mountain Campground will close on November 4; and Big Meadows Campground will close on November 25.

Concessioner-operated restaurants, lodges and associated facilities will operate as follows: Loft Mountain Campstore and Loft Mountain Showers/Laundry will close on October 28; Elkwallow Wayside, Big Meadows Lodge, and Loft Mountain Wayside will close on November 4. Lewis Mountain Cabins and Campstore will close on November 11. Big Meadows Wayside and Big Meadows Showers/Laundry will close on November 25. Skyland Resort will close on December 2 at noon.

This winter the following picnic grounds will remain open year round, weather permitting: Elkwallow, Pinnacles, South River, and Dundo Picnic Grounds. Lewis Mountain Picnic Grounds will close on November 4. The Dickey Ridge and Big Meadows Picnic Grounds will close on November 25. Loft Mountain Picnic Grounds remains closed.

Skyline Drive is open year round; however, the Drive may be temporarily closed on short notice due to winter weather conditions. During weather closures, park staff will work to open the North and Central Districts (from Front Royal to Route 33) first, followed by the South District (from Route 33 to Route 250).

For more information about planning a trip to Shenandoah National Park, go to http://www.nps.gov/shen or call the park at (540) 999-3500.

Did You Know?

Sunrise over the mountains

Benton McKaye, the “father of the Appalachian Trail,” was also instrumental in passage of the Wilderness Act. Shenandoah National Park carries on Benton McKaye’s legacy with 101 miles of the Appalachian Trail and almost 80,000 acres of designated wilderness. More...