• Visitors bask in a golden sunset at Dickey Ridge Visitor Center in Shenandoah National Park

    Shenandoah

    National Park Virginia

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  • No credit cards currently being accepted onsite at Loft Mountain Campground

    Due to technical difficulties, credit cards are not being accepted at Loft Mountain Campground as of 7/25/2014.

Natural Resource Education

Red cedar branch full of berries in the fall.

Often the most effective means of protecting park resources is through informing and educating the public. The National Park Service has a long history of supporting interpretive and educational programs and operating visitor centers. Traditionally, these functions have been handled by Park Rangers who specialize in communications skills. Programs and educational opportunities provided by these staff at Shenandoah can be found at the following links:

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For Kids

As park management has become more complicated and understanding about park resources has improved, the need for information transfer from the park biologists, ecologists, and other specialists has become increasingly important. Park scientists routinely work with the Park Rangers to develop educational material that will help the Rangers in their programs and that explains what we know about the animal and plant life, air and water quality, and park environmental concerns. The following links lead you to some of that information:

 
Natural Resources: a bear, a mushroom, a wildfire, and a flowing stream.

Did You Know?

o	The leathery grape fern, one of the rare plants in Big Meadows, has a fertile frond bearing small grapelike clusters of spore cases.

Shenandoah National Park has 431 rare plant populations representing 66 rare plant species. The highest concentration of these is in the park’s Big Meadows area