• Visitors bask in a golden sunset at Dickey Ridge Visitor Center in Shenandoah National Park

    Shenandoah

    National Park Virginia

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  • No credit cards currently being accepted onsite at Loft Mountain Campground

    Due to technical difficulties, credit cards are not being accepted at Loft Mountain Campground as of 7/25/2014.

Fishery Management and Monitoring

Of the approximately 90 small streams in the park, most contain brook trout. The cool forested slopes give rise to cool clear waters providing elcellent habitat for this species. Other common species occurring in the park include the blacknose and longnose dace, the mottled sculpin, the bluehead chub, the fantail darter, and in the east slope streams, the American Eel.

The park's Fisheries Management Plan has two objectives: to preserve and perpetuate native brook trout as a key component of the park's aquatic ecosystems; and to allow for recreational fishing on those park streams that consistently produce adequate numbers of brook trout for maintaining population stability. Regulations and policies (PDF, 347 kb) are designed to carry out these objectives.

Aside from regulations, management of the fishery includes the removal of exotic brown and rainbow trout from park streams. These removals are conducted in order to support the continued health of native brook trout populations.

Proper management of the fishery cannont occur without monitoring of fish resourcing. Fish monitoring is conducted every two years to ensure the Management Plan's objectives are being met, as well to better characterize the health of park aquatic ecosystems by assessing the status and trends of all fish species.

Other useful links:

http://www.nps.gov/shen/planyourvisit/fishing.htm

http://www.nps.gov/shen/naturescience/brook-trout.htm

http://www.nps.gov/shen/naturescience/brown-trout.htm

http://www.nps.gov/shen/naturescience/rainbow-trout.htm

Did You Know?

The adelgid is visible as tiny white cottony spots on the underside of the hemlock’s branches.

The most harmful exotic plants, animals and diseases in Shenandoah National Park include: chestnut blight, Dutch elm disease, dogwood anthracnose, gypsy moths, hemlock woolly adelgids, kudzu, mile-a-minute vine, Oriental bittersweet, and garlic mustard. More...