• Visitors bask in a golden sunset at Dickey Ridge Visitor Center in Shenandoah National Park

    Shenandoah

    National Park Virginia

Curriculum Materials

Most of the curriculum materials listed here are for the curriculum-based field trip programs offered in the park.The Good Character, Good Stewards lessons are designed for teachers to use in their classrooms and school. Interactive, internet-based lessons can be found on the Distance Learning page.

  • Ecosystems: The World-wide Web of Life

    Featured Materials

    Ecosystems: The World-wide Web of Life

    The world is composed of many natural ecosystems Explore »

  • Watersheds

    Featured Materials

    Watersheds

    Fresh water is a precious, non-renewable resource Explore »

  • A kindergarten student taking a close up look at a plant in Shenandoah.

    Featured Materials

    Come to Your Senses

    A child investigates the world and learns about his/her surroundings Explore »

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  • Shenandoah National Park

    Watersheds

    Watersheds

    Fresh water is a precious, non-renewable resource that is essential for life. People depend on it for drinking, transportation, livelihoods, and recreation. Water also provides habitat for many plants and animals. The manner in which this resource is protected has a direct impact upon the natural and human communities. Shenandoah National Park lies at the headwaters for three of Virginia’s watersheds.

  • Shenandoah National Park

    Exploring Earth Science

    Exploring Earth Science

    Exploring Earth Science in Shenandoah National Park provides middle and high school teachers with the support materials and training necessary to use Shenandoah National Park to instruct earth science and geology. Teachers must attend an instructional workshop to receive the materials and training.

Did You Know?

Water stands in a pit, called an Opferkessel, in a boulder on Old Rag Mountain.

The small circular pits (Opferkessels) often found in the rocks of Shenandoah National Park’s cliffs and summits are formed by standing water.