• We Won't Be Stopped!

    Selma To Montgomery

    National Historic Trail Alabama

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  • Interpretive Centers Closure on Wednesday, October 15, 2014

    The Lowndes Interpretive Center will close at 11:00 a.m. and the Selma Interpretive Center will be closed on Wednesday, October 15, 2014 due to an All Employee Training.

Edmund Winston Pettus Bridge

The Edmund Pettus Bridge Selma, Alabama

The Edmund Pettus Bridge Selma, Alabama

The Edmund Pettus bridge became a symbol of the momentous changes taking place in Alabama, America, and the world. It was here that voting rights marchers were violently confronted by law enforcement personnel on March 7, 1965. The day became known as Bloody Sunday.

The march resumed on Sunday March 21, with court protection through Federal District Court Judge Frank M. Johnson, Jr., who weighed the right of mobility against the right to march and ruled in favor of the demonstrators. "The law is clear that the right to petition one's government for the redress of grievances may be exercised in large groups...," said Judge Johnson, "and these rights may be exercised by marching, even along public highways."

This time, 3,200, versus the initial 600, marches headed east out of Selma, across the EdmundPettusBridge and on to Montgomery. Marches walked 12 miles a day and slept in fields. By the time they reached the capitol on Thursday, March 25, they were 25,000-strong. Less than five months later, President Lyndon Johnson signed the Voting Rights Act of 1965 -- the best possible redress of grievances.

Did You Know?

Edmund Pettus Bridge

On March 7, 1965, ABC News interrrupted the network's premiere showing of Judgement at Nuremburg to display 15 minutes of raw footage from the attack on the Edmund Pettus Bridge.