• Giant Sequoia Trees

    Sequoia & Kings Canyon

    National Parks California

There are park alerts in effect.
show Alerts »
  • Road Construction Delays on Park Roads for 2014 Season

    Expect occasional 15-minute to 1-hour delays in Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks on weekdays only (times vary), including delays to/from the General Sherman Tree, Crystal Cave, and Grant Grove. More »

  • Vehicle Length Limits in Sequoia National Park (if Entering/Exiting Hwy 198)

    Planning to see the "Big Trees" in Sequoia National Park? If you enter/exit via Hwy. 198, and your vehicle is longer than 22 feet (combined length), please pay close attention to vehicle length advisories for your safety and the safety of others. More »

  • You May Have Trouble Calling Us

    We are experiencing technical problems receiving incoming phone calls. We apologize for the inconvenience. Please send us an email to SEKI_Interpretation@nps.gov or check the "More" link for trip-planning information. More »

Mineral King Management Plan

Mineral King

The last comprehensive plan for the Mineral King Area was completed in 1980. The purpose of the Mineral King Management Plan (MKMP) is to evaluate recommendations from the park-wide planning documents and determine which would be implemented through the MKMP; to address current and future needs related to visitor use, natural and cultural resources protection, and land protection; to provide long-term management direction for the Mineral King area; and to establish direction and guidance for the protection of the Mineral King Road Cultural Landscape District.

 

Draft Purpose and Need for Action
In accordance with Public Law 95-625, Sec. 314, the National Park Service must manage the Mineral King Valley to:

  • Assure the preservation of the outstanding natural and scenic features for this and future generations;
  • Enhance the ecological values and public enjoyment;
  • Protect against the effects of siltation on the ecosystem with regard to routes of access to and within the Mineral King, and
  • Ensure the permanent conservation of wildlife.

Additionally, the plan needs to:

  • Evaluate recommendations from park-wide planning documents (GMP and others) and determine implementation priorities;
  • Address current and future needs related to visitor use, natural and cultural resources protection, and land protection and
  • Establish management direction and guidance for the protection of the Mineral King Road Cultural Landscape District (listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 2003).
 

Project Documents
MKMP Planning Participant Book - Includes information for public scoping including project information; Mineral King history; related legislation, policies and guides; draft planning objectives and other project scoping information. (pdf, 480KB)

Public Scoping Summary Newsletter - This newsletter provides a snapshot of the comments we received and the main public concerns expressed during public scoping which occurred from April, May, and June 2010. For more detailed information, please see the public scoping summary report posted under "Documents" on this website.

Public Scoping Summary Report - This document provides a summary of the public comments received during the public scoping period for the Mineral King Management Plan and Environmental Assessment.

Summary Report of Comments Received on Draft Standards for Sustaining the Mineral King Road Cultural Landscape District - The National Park Service is developing standards to sustain the long-term historic character of the Mineral King Road Cultural Landscape District (District). This District was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2003. Once finalized, the standards will be used by the Mineral King cabin owners and the National Park Service with the repair and maintenance of cabins and facilities within the District for the purposes of protecting this historic district.These standards (formerly called "guidelines") were available for public review in spring 2010. A second draft of the standards will be available in early 2011 for public review.

Related Legislation, Laws, Policies, Guidance & Plans
Mineral King Cultural Landscape Inventory
Enabling Legislation
General Management Plan (GMP)
GMP Record of Decision
Organic Act of 1916
Public Law 95-625, Sec. 314
Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2005 (Amendment), Sec. 314
NPS Reference Manual #41: Wilderness Management
MK 1980 Comprehensive Management Plan (CMP)
MK 1980 CMP Alternatives
MK 1980 CMP Environmental Assessment
MK 1980 CMP Intent
MK 1984 Land Protection Plan
MK 1991 Land Protection Plan
Omnibus Public Land Management Act of 2009 (John Krebbs Wilderness) (pdf, 1.3M)
MK Guidelines for Sustaining the Historic Character of the Mineral King Road Cultural Landscape District (Draft)

Resources
NPS Planning, Environment, and Public Comment (PEPC)
NPS project planning comment submission system

Guide to Repair and Maintenance
of Historic Summer Homes in Mineral King Road Cultural Landscape District (pdf, 1.3MB )

Checklist for Routine Repair and Maintenance
on Special Use Permit Cabins (pdf, 24KB)

Guide to using PEPC
Instructions on commenting through PEPC
Guide to Commenting
The Preservation of Mineral King
Mineral King District Association
Sequoia and Kings Canyon Mineral King web page

 

MKMP Planning Timeline

Time period

Process/Phase

Winter 2010

Internal Scoping

(April 15 through June 30)

Public Scoping

Ongoing

Scoping comments analyzed
Data collection
Alternatives development

Fall-Winter 2010

Finalize alternatives

Spring 2011

Public review of MKMP EA

Summer 2011 Analyze comments and select final alternative
Prepare decision document
Fall 2011 Superintendent recommends alternative to Regional Director

Did You Know?

Sequoia cross-section shows evidence of much fire damage and recovery

Sequoia tree rings tell a fascinating story of survival and adaptation. Many sequoia cross-sections do not show a neat set of concentric growth rings. Among the rings are many scars — indicating repeated fire damage — and as many curved rings, the growth that eventually covered over the scars.