• Giant Sequoia Trees

    Sequoia & Kings Canyon

    National Parks California

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  • Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks Institute Stage 2 Fire Restrictions

    Effective July 28, 2014, the parks are in Stage 2 fire restrictions. See link below for more information. These restrictions will remain in place until further notice. More »

  • Road Construction Delays Begin on Park Roads for 2014 Season

    Expect occasional 15-minute to 1-hour delays at various locations in Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks beginning Monday, June 2, weekdays only, between 5 a.m.-3 p.m., including delays to/from the General Sherman Tree, Crystal Cave, and Grant Grove. More »

  • Vehicle Length Limits in Sequoia National Park (if Entering/Exiting Hwy 198)

    Planning to see the "Big Trees" in Sequoia National Park? If you enter/exit via Hwy. 198, please pay close attention to vehicle length advisories for your safety and the safety of others. More »

  • You May Have Trouble Calling Us

    We are experiencing technical problems receiving incoming phone calls. We apologize for the inconvenience. Please send us an email to SEKI_Interpretation@nps.gov or check the "More" link for trip-planning information. More »

Tree Hazard Management

Truck with a large extension arm lifts a park forester to the top of a dead tree

Trees that have died near park developed areas must be removed when they pose a risk to visitors. This truck has a large extension arm that enables workers to get up to the branches of trees to limb them prior to cutting the tree down.

NPS Photo

Developed areas within these parks, including campgrounds, roadways, visitor centers, and administrative sites are managed to provide recreational opportunities for visitors and as an operation base for park management in as natural a setting as possible. The overall goal of managing vegetation in these areas is to restore and/or maintain a healthy, vigorous vegetative community that approximates the "natural" state, given the constraints of past and present human intervention, while providing a safe environment for human use and enjoyment. Because trees often contain structural defects that contribute to their failure and constitute a hazard to adjacent human use, the preservation of these trees must be sensitively balanced with the need to provide for visitor safety. As part of the tree hazard management program, foresters evaluate trees in developed areas for structural soundness and determine whether they pose a significant risk to people or buildings. In such cases, a specially trained crew of tree workers removes those trees or parts of trees that are likely to fail and cause harm to life or property.

Did You Know?

Conifer forest.

The richness of the Sierran flora mirrors that of the state as a whole. Of the nearly 6,000 species of vascular plants known to occur in California, over 20% can be found within Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks.