• Giant Sequoia Trees

    Sequoia & Kings Canyon

    National Parks California

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  • Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks Institute Fire Restrictions

    Effective June 18, 2014, the parks are in Stage 1 fire restrictions, see link below for more information. These restrictions will remain in place until further notice. More »

  • Road Construction Delays Begin on Park Roads for 2014 Season

    Expect occasional 15-minute to 1-hour delays at various locations in Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks beginning Monday, June 2, weekdays only, between 5 a.m.-3 p.m., including delays to/from the General Sherman Tree, Crystal Cave, and Grant Grove. More »

  • Vehicle Length Limits in Sequoia National Park (if Entering/Exiting Hwy 198)

    Planning to see the "Big Trees" in Sequoia National Park? If you enter/exit via Hwy. 198, please pay close attention to vehicle length advisories for your safety and the safety of others. More »

  • You May Have Trouble Calling Us

    We are experiencing technical problems receiving incoming phone calls. We apologize for the inconvenience. Please send us an email to SEKI_Interpretation@nps.gov or check the "More" link for trip-planning information. More »

Fire History

Fire History

Numerous species of conifers record the occurrence of forest fires. A fire may be recorded as a lesion in an annual ring when living cambium, usually on the margins of a catface, is injuring by the heat of the fire. Over time multiple injuries (fire scars) can occur.

Using dendrochronological crossdating methods actual calander dates can be assigned to each fire scar. These methods also mean that samples from trees dead for many decades (or centuries) can be utilized so that few living trees need to be sampled.

The dates on this ponderosa pine cross-section indicate fire scars that are recorded in the tree's annual growth rings. Reconstructions of fire regimes using this proxy data source can provide valuable information to managers and ecologists on the frequency and season of past fires. © Photo by Anthony Caprio.

Document http://www.nps.gov/archive/seki/fire/popup_window_firehist.htm
Last Modified 09/28/2007 10:16:54

Did You Know?

Toppled sequoia tree.

Sequoias get so large because they grow fast over a long lifetime. They live so long because they are resistant to many insects and diseases, and because they can survive most fires. Sequoias do have a weakness — a shallow root system. The main cause of death among mature sequoias is toppling.