• Giant Sequoia Trees

    Sequoia & Kings Canyon

    National Parks California

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  • Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks Institute Stage 2 Fire Restrictions

    Effective July 28, 2014, the parks are in Stage 2 fire restrictions. See link below for more information. These restrictions will remain in place until further notice. More »

  • Road Construction Delays Begin on Park Roads for 2014 Season

    Expect occasional 15-minute to 1-hour delays at various locations in Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks beginning Monday, June 2, weekdays only, between 5 a.m.-3 p.m., including delays to/from the General Sherman Tree, Crystal Cave, and Grant Grove. More »

  • Vehicle Length Limits in Sequoia National Park (if Entering/Exiting Hwy 198)

    Planning to see the "Big Trees" in Sequoia National Park? If you enter/exit via Hwy. 198, please pay close attention to vehicle length advisories for your safety and the safety of others. More »

  • You May Have Trouble Calling Us

    We are experiencing technical problems receiving incoming phone calls. We apologize for the inconvenience. Please send us an email to SEKI_Interpretation@nps.gov or check the "More" link for trip-planning information. More »

Fire Scar Images

Fire record from mid-elevation xeric conifer forest (primarily Jeffrey pine). Fire return intervals in this forest type usually range between 20-50 years (average of about 30 years) on the west slope of the Sierra Nevada.
Fire record from mid-elevation xeric conifer forest (primarily Jeffrey pine). Fire return intervals in this forest type usually range between 20-50 years (average of about 30 years) on the west slope of the Sierra Nevada.
NPS Photo by Anthony Caprio.
 
Record of fires from low elevation ponderosa pine forest with a high frequency fire regime. Between 1809 and 1860, the period prior to EuroAmerican settlement, 19 fires were recorded by this tree.

NPS Photo by Anthony Caprio

Record of fires from low elevation ponderosa pine forest with a high frequency fire regime. Between 1809 and 1860, the period prior to EuroAmerican settlement, 19 fires were recorded by this tree. © Photo by Anthony Caprio.
 
Long interval fire frequency regime from an upper elevation forest composed of red fir, western white pine, and small amounts of lodgepole pine. Fires are typically understory burns in red fir forest although small-to-moderate sized patches of overstory mortality can occur.

Red fir trees are moderately tolerant of low intensity fire with larger trees having fairly thick fire resistant bark. In contrast, both western white and lodgepole pine have relatively thin bark that provides poor protection from fire. Thus they gernerally suffer proportionally higher mortality rates than red fir.
Long interval fire frequency regime from an upper elevation forest composed of red fir, western white pine, and small amounts of lodgepole pine. Fires are typically understory burns in red fir forest although small-to-moderate sized patches of overstory mortality can occur.

Red fir trees are moderately tolerant of low intensity fire with larger trees having fairly thick fire resistant bark. In contrast, both western white and lodgepole pine have relatively thin bark that provides poor protection from fire. Thus they gernerally suffer proportionally higher mortality rates than red fir.
Photo by Anthony Caprio

Did You Know?

Loggers pose in front of a mighty felled sequoia.

Sequoia wood proved too brittle for most lumber uses. Some felled sequoias even shattered as they hit the ground. Most lumbered sequoias ended up as fence posts, shingles, and even match sticks!