• Giant Sequoia Trees

    Sequoia & Kings Canyon

    National Parks California

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  • Road Construction Delays on Park Roads for 2014 Season

    Expect occasional 15-minute to 1-hour delays in Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks on weekdays only (times vary), including delays to/from the General Sherman Tree, Crystal Cave, and Grant Grove. More »

  • Vehicle Length Limits in Sequoia National Park (if Entering/Exiting Hwy 198)

    Planning to see the "Big Trees" in Sequoia National Park? If you enter/exit via Hwy. 198, and your vehicle is longer than 22 feet (combined length), please pay close attention to vehicle length advisories for your safety and the safety of others. More »

  • You May Have Trouble Calling Us

    We are experiencing technical problems receiving incoming phone calls. We apologize for the inconvenience. Please send us an email to SEKI_Interpretation@nps.gov or check the "More" link for trip-planning information. More »

Air Quality -- Education

Hiker on John Muir/Pacific Crest Trail above Charlotte Lake in Kings Canyon National Park
Good air quality is an essential part of the experience that draws people to the parks. But more importantly, it is something we simply cannot live without.
NPS Photo
 

Educational outreach is a large component of the air program of these Parks. Informational talks are given as training to park employees who in turn provide information to visitors to these Parks. Air pollution issues are presented to school groups, various organizations, and the media. Education focuses on different types of air pollution present in the Parks, the sources of Park air pollutants, air pollution monitoring efforts by Park staff, possible effects of air pollutants on living things within the Parks, and actions that people can take to help prevent and reduce air pollution.

Education Links

California Air Resources Board
San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control District

Did You Know?

Loggers pose in front of a mighty felled sequoia.

Sequoia wood proved too brittle for most lumber uses. Some felled sequoias even shattered as they hit the ground. Most lumbered sequoias ended up as fence posts, shingles, and even match sticks!