• Giant Sequoia Trees

    Sequoia & Kings Canyon

    National Parks California

There are park alerts in effect.
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  • Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks Institute Stage 2 Fire Restrictions

    Effective July 28, 2014, the parks are in Stage 2 fire restrictions. See link below for more information. These restrictions will remain in place until further notice. More »

  • Road Construction Delays Begin on Park Roads for 2014 Season

    Expect occasional 15-minute to 1-hour delays at various locations in Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks beginning Monday, June 2, weekdays only, between 5 a.m.-3 p.m., including delays to/from the General Sherman Tree, Crystal Cave, and Grant Grove. More »

  • Vehicle Length Limits in Sequoia National Park (if Entering/Exiting Hwy 198)

    Planning to see the "Big Trees" in Sequoia National Park? If you enter/exit via Hwy. 198, please pay close attention to vehicle length advisories for your safety and the safety of others. More »

  • You May Have Trouble Calling Us

    We are experiencing technical problems receiving incoming phone calls. We apologize for the inconvenience. Please send us an email to SEKI_Interpretation@nps.gov or check the "More" link for trip-planning information. More »

Air Quality -- Acidic Deposition

A solar powered, aerochemetric rain sampler and rain gauge collect precipitation and dry atmospheric deposition data at Emerald Lake in Sequoia National Park.

A solar powered, aerochemetric rain sampler and rain gauge collect precipitation and dry atmospheric deposition data at Emerald Lake in Sequoia National Park.

NPS Photo

High-elevation lakes and streams in the parks are potentially sensitive to human-induced acid deposition (acidic rain, snow, and particles). While chronic acidification is not a problem at present, there are episodes when the capacity of our lakes and streams to neutralize acids gets reduced -- during snowmelt and during the "dirty" rainstorms of summer and early fall -- and the water becomes acidic for a time. If acid deposition increases in the future, a likely scenario given the tremendous population growth in the San Joaquin Valley, these episodes of acidification will become more frequent and can be expected to alter our aquatic ecosystems.

Links
Environmental Protection Agency -- Acid Rain Effects

Did You Know?

Yellow Star thistle

The yellow star thistle is one of many invasive and damaging non-native plants threatening the parks. It quickly takes over areas, displacing native plants and the native animals that rely on them. Please avoid bringing seeds and non-native plant materials into the parks. More...