• Giant Sequoia Trees

    Sequoia & Kings Canyon

    National Parks California

There are park alerts in effect.
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  • The Generals Highway "Road Between the Parks" is OPEN

    The section of road between Lodgepole (Sequoia) and Grant Grove (Kings Canyon) is open. Call 559-565-3341 (press 1, 1) for 24-hour road updates.

  • Be Prepared! Tire Chains or Cables May Be Required in the Parks at Any Time

    All vehicles must carry chains or cables when entering a chain-restricted area. It's the law (CA Vehicle Code, Section 605, Sections 27450-27503). Road conditions may change often. For road conditions, call 559-565-3341 (press 1, 1). More »

  • You May Have Trouble Calling Us

    We are experiencing technical problems receiving incoming phone calls. We apologize for the inconvenience. Please send us an email to SEKI_Interpretation@nps.gov or check the "More" link for trip-planning information. More »

  • Vehicle Length Limits in Sequoia National Park (if Entering/Exiting Hwy 198)

    Planning to see the "Big Trees" in Sequoia National Park? If you enter/exit via Hwy. 198, please pay close attention to vehicle length advisories for your safety and the safety of others. More »

Air Quality -- Acidic Deposition

A solar powered, aerochemetric rain sampler and rain gauge collect precipitation and dry atmospheric deposition data at Emerald Lake in Sequoia National Park.

A solar powered, aerochemetric rain sampler and rain gauge collect precipitation and dry atmospheric deposition data at Emerald Lake in Sequoia National Park.

NPS Photo

High-elevation lakes and streams in the parks are potentially sensitive to human-induced acid deposition (acidic rain, snow, and particles). While chronic acidification is not a problem at present, there are episodes when the capacity of our lakes and streams to neutralize acids gets reduced -- during snowmelt and during the "dirty" rainstorms of summer and early fall -- and the water becomes acidic for a time. If acid deposition increases in the future, a likely scenario given the tremendous population growth in the San Joaquin Valley, these episodes of acidification will become more frequent and can be expected to alter our aquatic ecosystems.

Links
Environmental Protection Agency -- Acid Rain Effects

Did You Know?

Loggers pose in front of a mighty felled sequoia.

Sequoia wood proved too brittle for most lumber uses. Some felled sequoias even shattered as they hit the ground. Most lumbered sequoias ended up as fence posts, shingles, and even match sticks!