• Scenic rural landscape with green lawn, cloud-flecked blue sky, and autumn foliage punctuated by a small, deep red farmhouse and red cannon carriages.

    Saratoga

    National Historical Park New York

Saratoga Monument Virtual Tour part 3

View of the outside of Saratoga Monument.  The stone obelisk reaches high into the cloud flecked blue sky.

View of the outside of Saratoga Monument.

Outside, you can see four niches that were intended to contain statues of four American commanders directly or indirectly associated with the Battles of Saratoga.
 
Life-sized bronze statue of American General Horatio Gates.  He holds a small telescope and looks into the distance.

Bronze statue of American General Horatio Gates.

Facing north is General Horatio Gates, who had overall command of the American army in the battles. He gazes northward, anticipating the imminent arrival of the southward-invading British army.
 
Bronze statue of American General Philip Schuyler.  Beneath his feet reads "1777 Saratoga 1877".

Bronze statue of American General Philip Schuyler.

Facing east, above the golden text, is American General Philip Schuyler. His country estate is downhill and east of here. It was burned by the British as they were retreating north from the battlefield (about 8 miles south of Saratoga Monument).
 
Empty niche originally intended to hold a statue of American General Benedict Arnold.

The "empty niche".

The empty niche, facing south toward the battlefield, was originally for a statue of American General Benedict Arnold.
 
Bronze statue of American Colonel Daniel Morgan.  He raises his left hand to shield his eyes in the afternoon sun.

Colonel Daniel Morgan.

Facing west is the bronze statue of American Colonel Daniel Morgan, whose riflemen and light infantry troops were positioned west of here to prevent the British from escaping in that direction.

 

Did You Know?

Closeup image of a Black soldier in American regimental uniform.

American armies during the Revolutionary War had integrated service –Black soldiers serving alongside white counterparts. But for a few exceptions in practice, the policy of integrated service did not return until the Korean War.