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    Saratoga

    National Historical Park New York

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Black Patriots at the Battle of Saratoga

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Date: January 30, 2011
Contact: Gina Johnson, 518-664-9821 ext. 227

In recognition of Black History Month, Saratoga National Historical Park will offer a temporary exhibit from February 1 through February 28 called “Agrippa Hull – Ordinary Soldier, Extraordinary Man” and on Sunday, February 13 at 1:30pm in the visitor center, Ranger Eric Schnitzer will present a special program about black soldiers at Saratoga.

Ranger Program: In the American Revolution, about 5 percent of the Continental Soldiers were of African descent. They fought shoulder to shoulder with white soldiers—but an integrated army would not occur again until the Korean War. That’s just scratching the surface of the information to be presented by Park Ranger Eric Schnitzer as he discusses evidence from memoirs, journals, muster rolls, and pay lists that documents the roles of free and enslaved African Americans who fought in “the most important battle of the last 1000 years.”

Exhibit: Agrippa Hull, a black Revolutionary War soldier who served in the 1777 Battles of Saratoga, is the focus of a special exhibit titled “Agrippa Hull: ordinary soldier, extraordinary man.” Copies of Hull’s 1777 company muster roll, pension claims, portrait, and photographs of him and his wife Peggy will be on display in the visitor center in February.

Did You Know?

An 18th century fleam with three different key-like blades used for blood-letting.

Feeling ill? In the 18th century, your physician might prescribe blood-letting, which was thought to restore the balance of humors (perceived fluids supposedly determining health) in the blood.