• Stars appear behind a dramatic landscape of rocky mountains, rolling hills, and fields of grass

    Santa Monica Mountains

    National Recreation Area California

Permit Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

Each event is so unique and special that there are bound to be questions not listed here. However, over the years we have built a list of our most frequently asked questions (FAQs).

How do I apply for a permit?

Requests for permits are taken by phone and/or e-mail in the order received. Leave a voice message and your call will be returned.

What do I need to have ready before I call / e-mail the park?

Dates, times, number of hours, total number of people, any activities I want to have (games, moon-bounce, etc.), what type of deliveries; food services / catering, decorations, equipment, and most importantly, the location.

If I am photographing a friend / family member do I need a permit?

Taking pictures as part of your vacation or family outing is encouraged always. However, taken photographs for compensation requires a permit.

How is the cell phone coverage?

Being that you will be located in a national park, cell-phone coverage can be spotty and unreliable.

Can I get wireless internet?

No, the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area does not provide wireless internet access.

Do you have a business center that I can use (fax machine, copy machine, computers, etc.)?

No, the use of government facilities and equipment is not permitted under federal law.

Do you have a kitchen, mess area, or other food services prep area?

No, however it is encouraged that you use a caterer that has a familiarity with the site before you apply for your permit.

I'm not sure if I can have my event / activity in the national park. Can you still help me out?

Feel free to call or e-mail us. Remember, we're here to help.

Hey Ranger, you forgot to answer my question on your list. How can I talk to you?

You can call or e-mail the Permit Office by visiting the Permit Contacts page by clicking here.

Did You Know?

The need for plants used in restoration projects loomed large for many years, but volunteers made it happen.

A core group of dedicated National Park volunteers, often laboring in the hot sun, built a native plant nursery from the ground up in 2002. Native plants, from the common Ceanothus to the endangered Lyons pygmy daisy germinated in this volunteer-run nursery will help restore disturbed habitat.