• Stars appear behind a dramatic landscape of rocky mountains, rolling hills, and fields of grass

    Santa Monica Mountains

    National Recreation Area California

Closures & Restrictions

During Wet Months:

Sometimes rain will cause the closure of unpaved parking areas. Lots usually reopen 1-2 days after the rain stops. Parking lots most commonly closed during or after rain are:

  • Zuma Canyon Lot at Bonsall Drive.
  • Rocky Oaks Main Lot at Mulholland Hwy.
  • Peter Strauss Ranch extended unpaved lot at Mulholland Hwy.
  • Cheeseboro Canyon Parking Lot off of Chesebro Road.

Use Caution and be Conscientious. During or shortly after rain, hazardous trail conditions may occur: including slippery trails, rock falls, tree falls, mud flows, and mud pits, especially in recent fire areas. When these conditions occur, recreational trail use is not recommended. Regular trail use can usually begin 1-2 days after the rain stops. If you notice hazardous trail conditions, resource damage or would like updates, please contact our Visitor Center--805-370-2301.

 

During Fire Season:

For your safety, public lands in the Santa Monica Mountains may be closed to public use during severe fire weather conditions.

Click here to download the 2012 Fire Restriction Notice.

For National Park Service site in the mountains, call 805-370-2301 during busness hours for more information.

For California State Parks, call 805-488-8147 for a 24-hour recording on closures of State Parks within the Santa Monica Mountains.


Fire Weather Terms:

"Red Flag Warning"

A Red Flag Warning means increased fire danger and the high possibility of a quickly spreading fire in the area within 24 hours. The National Weather Service watches several factors which may include: lower than normal humidity permitting easier ignition and spreading, as well as potentially strong, dry winds that may cause the fire to move faster.

"Fire Weather Watch"

A Fire Weather Watch means that critical fire weather conditions are forecast to occur or are possible within the short term. If conditions persist then a Red Flag Warning may be issued.

Did You Know?

A community project led by the National Park Service has restored Zuma Lagoon.

Many hands spanning different generations and agencies continue to turn back the clock on damage to the fragile environment at Zuma Lagoon. After the removal of debris and the restoration of native plants, beach visitors now find a living wetland with 108 species of birds and colorful wildflowers.