• Stars appear behind a dramatic landscape of rocky mountains, rolling hills, and fields of grass

    Santa Monica Mountains

    National Recreation Area California

Map and Information: Leo Carrillo State Park

Leo Carrillo State Beach

Photo by Rich Greene.

Covering a two and a half miles of rugged shore and beach, this park has opportunities for swimming, surfing, windsurfing, and surf fishing. Beachgoers will enjoy exploring the tidal pools and coastal caves for varieties of sea stars, anemones, mussels, crabs and other tidepool creatures. The popular surrounding camp sites are shaded by region-specific Sycamore trees. Beginner hikers can enjoy wildlife and breathtaking views, including the Islands, on the 7 miles of trails. The Park was named after Leo Carrillo, a popular Broadway, film, radio and TV performer who also served on the California State Park and Recreation Commission. One of his more recognizable roles was the comic sidekick in the television series “The Cisco Kid.” Leo Carrillo was instrumental in the state’s acquisition of much of the property between Malibu Lagoon and Point Mugu, including the area named after him.

 
Bus stop, restrooms, stroller access, ranger station, store, camping, picnic area, biking, easy hiking, moderate hiking, strenuous hiking, wildlife viewing, wildflower viewing, swimming, and water sports.
 
LeoCarrillo

Site Info and Map

Leo Carrillo State Park Brochure (PDF - 1.1 MB)

Fee may be collected for entry.
Fee required for camping.

Directions

35000 West Pacific Coast Highway, Malibu, CA 90265

Main Entrance and Campground: Pacific Coast Hwy at Mulholland Highway.

Nicholas Flat Trailhead: From Pacific Coast Hwy, turn north on Decker Road. Travel about 2 miles and turn left on Decker School Road (not Decker School Lane). Follow road to the end.

 
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To learn more about this site, visit the Leo Carrillo State Park webpage.

This site is managed and operated by California State Parks.

Did You Know?

Sue Nelson, Jill Swift, and Margo Feurer were instrumental in the movement to create a national recreation area near Los Angeles.

Four state parks were the triumph of a grassroots movement to protect open spaces minutes from Los Angeles in the 1950s & 60s. Three women, Sue Nelson, Jill Swift, and Margo Feuer further galvanized the movement that helped make Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area a reality in 1978.