• Stars appear behind a dramatic landscape of rocky mountains, rolling hills, and fields of grass

    Santa Monica Mountains

    National Recreation Area California

Native American Winter Solstice Sale Set for December 2

Coiling Pottery from previous Winter Solstice Art Show and Sale
Hand coiling pottery art from Navajo and Pueblo of Isleta artist Rowan Harrison, who travels from New Mexico to attend the annual event.
National Park Service

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News Release Date: November 9, 2012
Contact: Kate Kuykendall, 805-370-2343

NEWBURY PARK, Calif. -- As an early winter solstice celebration, and just in time for holiday shopping, the National Park Service will host its annual Winter Solstice Art Show and Sale on Sunday, December 2 from 10:00 a.m. until 3:00 p.m. at Satwiwa Native American Indian Culture Center in Newbury Park.

More than a dozen Native American artists from various tribes will show and sell paintings, ceramics, stone carvings, dreamcatchers, gourds and musical instruments.

Renowned Potawatami artist Nadiya Littlewarrior presents gourd workshops throughout the American Southwest, and will be showing some of her most celebrated work. Other artists of note include painter and architect Michael Williams, photographer Valena Dismukes, and Chumash stone carver Ted Garcia.

Support traditional and original artwork and learn the techniques and traditions behind the gift. All ages are welcome, and the program and parking are free. Call the Santa Monica Mountains Interagency visitor center for more information: 805-370-2301.

Directions to Satwiwa Native American Indian Culture Center:
From the Ventura Freeway (101), exit at Wendy Drive and head south. Turn right on Lynn Road. Turn left on Via Goleta. Continue all the way to a parking lot where the road ends. Walk 0.3 miles to the Culture Center.

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Did You Know?

The adult female of this cub died in 2005.

A study that began in 2002 reveals a lion and his offspring are surviving in the Santa Monica Mountains. Radio collars track them crossing roads and navigating through open spaces. Their future is uncertain, but with conservation efforts, they may continue to make these mountains their home.