• Stars appear behind a dramatic landscape of rocky mountains, rolling hills, and fields of grass

    Santa Monica Mountains

    National Recreation Area California

Public Meetings Scheduled for Santa Monica Mountains Trail Management Plan

Family walking on trail
The park agencies that comprise Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area are developing a comprehensive plan for more than 500 miles of trails. Above, a family enjoys a hike at Rancho Sierra Vista in Newbury Park.
National Park Service

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News Release Date: February 5, 2014
Contact: Kate Kuykendall, 805-370-2343

THOUSAND OAKS, Calif. – Park officials are preparing an interagency trail management plan for the approximately 500 miles of trails within Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area. 

Because the trail network crosses multiple jurisdictions, California State Parks, the National Park Service, the Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy and Mountains Recreation and Conservation Authority will develop a joint environmental impact statement (EIS) and environmental impact report (EIR).

As part of the environmental review process, the public is invited to participate in public scoping meetings and to provide comments on the scope of the environmental analysis and the range of potential project alternatives. The goal is to create a comprehensive plan for circulation, access and allowable uses throughout the trail network.

The first public meeting will be on Thursday, February 20 at 6:30 p.m. at King Gillette Ranch (Dining Hall) in Calabasas. The second meeting will be on Saturday, February 22 at 10:00 a.m. at Temescal Gateway Park (Woodland Hall) in Pacific Palisades.

Comments may be submitted in writing at the public meetings or via one of the following methods by April 1, 2014:

More information is available at www.nps.gov/samo/parkmgmt/tmp-index.htm.

Any person wishing to receive email notifications concerning this process should contact e-mail us. Comments will not be accepted at this email address.

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