• Stars appear behind a dramatic landscape of rocky mountains, rolling hills, and fields of grass

    Santa Monica Mountains

    National Recreation Area California

Learn the Art of Surf Fishing on Free Fishing Day July 6

Fishing_RangerRyan
Ranger Ryan Stead is one of three National Park Service rangers who will be leading a free surf fishing lesson as part of the state's "Free Fishing Days" on Saturday, July 6.
National Park Service

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News Release Date: June 24, 2013
Contact: Kate Kuykendall, 805-370-2343

MALIBU, Calif. – An opportunity to learn or improve your surf fishing skills will be offered by the National Park Service on Saturday, July 6 from 9:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. at Leo Carrillo State Park in Malibu. The event is one of two "Free Fishing Days" sponsored by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife. 

"Surf fishing is one of the many exciting recreational opportunities in Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area," said National Park Service ranger Ryan Stead. "This is a chance to learn from a few park rangers who enjoy the challenge of the sport."

The rangers will provide free training and limited bait, with the added bonus of not needing a sport fishing license. All you need is a rod and reel and $12 for Leo Carrillo State Park's parking lot.

Meet at the north beach of the park. For more information, contact Ryan Stead at 805-370-3176.

DIRECTIONS: Leo Carrillo State Park is located at 35000 West Pacific Coast Highway in Malibu. 

Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area (SMMNRA) is the largest urban national park in the country, encompassing more than 150,000 acres of mountains and coastline in Ventura and Los Angeles counties. A unit of the National Park System, it comprises a seamless network of local, state, and federal parks interwoven with private lands and communities. As one of only five Mediterranean ecosystems in the world, SMMNRA preserves the rich biological diversity of more than 450 animal species and 26 distinct plant communities. For more information, visit www.nps.gov/samo. 

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Did You Know?

The adult female of this cub died in 2005.

A study that began in 2002 reveals a lion and his offspring are surviving in the Santa Monica Mountains. Radio collars track them crossing roads and navigating through open spaces. Their future is uncertain, but with conservation efforts, they may continue to make these mountains their home.