• Afternoon clouds cover the distance peaks of the iconic Boney Mountain

    Santa Monica Mountains

    National Recreation Area California

National Park Service Hosts National Trails Day June 2

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Date: May 29, 2012
Contact: Kate Kuykendall, 805.370.2343

NEWBURY PARK, Calif. -- The National Park Service invites you to join a community of partners in an effort to repair popular hiking trails at Rancho Sierra Vista in Newbury Park on Saturday, June 2nd from 8:30 am to 12:30 pm.

Roll up your sleeves and get in on the fun as we build, repair and give back to our local trails. National Trails Day is supported by the California Department of Parks & Recreation, Santa Monica Mountains Trails Council and the Santa Monica Mountains Task Force of the Sierra Club.Volunteers should dress appropriately with work gloves, protective footwear, long sleeves and pants and sun protection. Tools will be provided.

Anyone under the age of 18 must be accompanied by an adult. To register and learn more, contact Mike Malone at 805-370-2317 or e-mail us.

Directions to Rancho Sierra Vista: Take the 101 Ventura Freeway to Thousand Oaks. Exit Lynn Road south (turn left if coming from LA). After passing the Reino Road intersection, go one mile to Via Goleta. Turn left at Via Goleta (park entrance) into parking lot.

Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area (SMMNRA) is the largest urban national park in the country, encompassing more than 150,000 acres of mountains and coastline in Ventura and Los Angeles counties. It comprises a seamless network of local, state, and federal parks interwoven with private lands and communities. As one of only five Mediterranean ecosystems in the world, SMMNRA preserves the rich biological diversity of more than 450 animal species and 26 distinct plant communities. The mountains are home to 20 endangered plant and animal species.

Did You Know?

The need for plants used in restoration projects loomed large for many years, but volunteers made it happen.

A core group of dedicated National Park volunteers, often laboring in the hot sun, built a native plant nursery from the ground up in 2002. Native plants, from the common Ceanothus to the endangered Lyons pygmy daisy germinated in this volunteer-run nursery will help restore disturbed habitat.