• Stars appear behind a dramatic landscape of rocky mountains, rolling hills, and fields of grass

    Santa Monica Mountains

    National Recreation Area California

Red Swamp Crayfish (Procambarus clarkii)

The Red Swamp Crayfish can spread rapidly in areas where they are invasive.

This non-native crayfish thrives in the waters of the Santa Monica Mountains, eating the eggs of amphibians, disrupting fragile fresh water environments and hosting a variety of unwelcome parasites. A noticeable decrease in amphibians has been attributed to crayfish predation. Crayfish are continually introduced to the Santa Monica Mountains because of their utilization as fishing bait.

What you can do!

Cease buying crayfish as fishing bait and encourage other fishers to do the same! Talk with local legislators to have crayfish banned as bait in the area and be sure to decontaminate all fishing equipment before entering the National Recreation Area.

Did You Know?

Rangers from California State Parks and the National Park Service discuss program ideas.

Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area was established in 1978, but the National Park Service did not own public parkland in the area until 1980. National Park Rangers devised clever ways to promote the national park goals without land by creating thriving partnerships with many agencies.