• Afternoon clouds cover the distance peaks of the iconic Boney Mountain

    Santa Monica Mountains

    National Recreation Area California

Let's Move Outside

Students race to finish an obstacle course at Leo Carrillo State Beach as part of a ranger-led fitness program.

Hey Kids! Did you know that 60 minutes of active and vigorous play outdoors keeps your body healthy? It reduces stress, boosts your immune system, maintains healthy bones, and keeps you at a healthy weight!

Junior Rangers across America are becoming Let's Move Outside Junior Rangers by staying active in their local national parks.

 
This is the Let's Move Outside logo.  Inside of the logo is a blue circle portrayed as the sky with a white cloud and a red-orange sun.  There is a green hill at the bottom with the words "Let's Move!" on it.  There is a green border circling the logo.

You can become a Let's Move Outside Junior Ranger by completing one of the following:

- Join a National Park Ranger on an outdoor Junior Ranger Program.
- Attend a Let's Move Outside Program.

By moving outside you will take a step to leading a healthy lifestyle and receive a special sticker indicating that you have completed the requirements to become a Let's Move Outside Junior Ranger!

 
Students do stretching exercises  before a morning hike with National Park Service Rangers at Leo Carrillo State Beach.

Completing two more activities in the Junior Ranger booklet will make you an official Santa Monica Mountains Junior Ranger. It can be picked up for FREE at the Visitor Center in Calabasas, CA or at the Satwiwa Native American Indian Culture Center in Newbury Park, CA.

See the Let's Move Outside official website for more information. Contact Ranger Razsa (by clicking her name) by e-mail with questions about Let's Move Outside in the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area.

Did You Know?

Rangers from California State Parks and the National Park Service discuss program ideas.

Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area was established in 1978, but the National Park Service did not own public parkland in the area until 1980. National Park Rangers devised clever ways to promote the national park goals without land by creating thriving partnerships with many agencies.