• Salem Maritime National Historic Site

    Salem Maritime

    National Historic Site Massachusetts

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  • Central Wharf Restrooms Closed

    The Central Wharf public restrooms will be closed on Thursday and Friday, September 18th and 19th for exterior door replacement. They are scheduled to reopen on Saturday at 9am.

  • Fishing Prohibition on Hold

    On 8/20/14 the park issued a rule change prohibiting fishing throughout the park due to concerns over water quality and visitor safety. The fishing prohibition is now on hold, pending further review - click for more information. More »

The Narbonne House

The Narbonne House is a two story grey house. On the left of the center chimney is a peaked roof, and on the right is a lower barn like, or gambrel roof.

The Narbonne House has the typical interior chimney and peaked roof of a middle class 17th century home.

NPS photo

The Narbonne House was built in 1675 for butcher Thomas Ives. It is a remarkable example of a middle-class family home of the 17th and 18th centuries.

The taller section of the building is the original house. It still has its original pointed, or peaked, roof and its original brick chimney. When the house was first built, it only had a single room on the first floor, called the hall, a single room on the second floor (the hall chamber), an attic and a shallow root cellar. Later owners added a kitchen on the back of the house, and a smaller addition on the side that has a parlor on the first floor and a chamber on the second.

The house is named after Sarah Narbonne, whose grandfather Jonathan Andrews purchased the house in 1780. Sarah was born in the Narbonne house, and lived there for her entire life, which stretched nearly the length of the 19th century. She died in 1895 at the age of 101, and her unmarried daughter Mary continued to live in the house until her death in 1905. In 1963, the National Park Service purchased the historic building from the family of Mary Narbonne’s nephew Frank Hale. One of the things that make this building so special is its history of nearly 300 years of continued occupation, 200 years of which are members of one family.

In keeping with modern preservation practices, the Narbonne House has not been restored to one time period. Instead, Salem Maritime NHS is preserving it as an architectural study house in order to show how the structure changed over the nearly 330 years of its existence.

 

Visiting the Narbonne House

The Narbonne House open by tour only. Click here to visit our tour page.

For More Information

On architecture in Salem:

Pickled Fish and Salted Provisions
Links to pdf files of our occasional publication on subjects associated with Salem Maritime National Historic Site. These issues are directly related to the Narbonne House.

 

The Northeast Museum Services Center Archaeology Blog

The National Park Service's Northeast Museum Services Center provides support for the museum collections in the National Park Services' northeast region. The archaeologists, curators, archivists, and conservators at the center assist staff at the National Park Service sites to document, properly store, and repair objects that are on display in the historic buildings and galleries, or stored at the parks for study. During a recent project to rehouse the over 150,000 artifacts found in the Narbonne House backyard, the staff in the archaeology lab blogged about some of the amazing artifacts they found in the collection.

Faunal Remains -- A glimpse into 200 year old left over dinner

Ask a Curator -- A wine bottle seal from 1772

Party Like it's 1776: A Look at Eighteenth Century Ceramics

More than Just a Witch City: A look at life in Salem MA

There's Jackfield Afoot: Tracing Patterns of Consumption Through an 18th Century Teapot

Gardening at the Narbonne House: a Redware Flowerpot

 

Did You Know?

The octant is a navigational tool based on the curve of one eighth of a circle. It measures angles for solar and celestial navigation.

In 1799, Salem native Nathaniel Bowditch revised John H. Moore's New Practical Navigator, the standard navigation manual of the 18th century. Bowditch discovered and corrected over 8,000 errors in Moore's manual! In 1802, Bowditch published the New American Practical Navigator.