• Saugus Iron Works Panorama

    Saugus Iron Works

    National Historic Site Massachusetts

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  • Park Closed for the Season

    The park will be closed from Nov 1st, 2013 to Spring 2014. Visitor information is available online, via facebook.com/SaugusIronNPS or by calling the Salem Visitor Center at (978) 740-1650.

Transfer of Technology

The impact of Saugus Iron Works would reach well past its 22 years of operation. It would, in fact, reach well past the seventeenth century. The effect of the Saugus Iron Works can still be felt today as the iron industry remains one of the largest in our country.

By hiring skilled workers from England and teaching countless others the trade, Saugus Iron Works would prepare hundreds of workers to build and start iron works of their own after this one went out of business. As more and more workers became skilled and the industry grew, one important fact remained clear; it all started here. As you explore the site you’ll find the answer for these activities. Complete one of them to earn your badge!

 

Did You Know?

Painting by Don Trianti depicts the first National Guard muster that took place in late 1636/7. Civilian soldiers are in formation dressed in buff coats, helmets, and bandoliers. They drill with their muskets with smoke coming from the chimneys of their thatched-roof houses in the background.

On Thursday, January 10, 2013 President Obama signed into law HR1339 which designates Salem, Massachusetts as the birthplace of the National Guard. Future ironworks founder John Winthrop, Jr. was commissioned as Lieutenant Colonel of the East Regiment on March 9, 1636/7. The East Regiment included the communities of Salem, Saugus (changed to Lynn later in 1637), Ipswich, and Newbury.