• The Little Studio and Saint-Gaudens' home

    Saint-Gaudens

    National Historic Site New Hampshire

Special Use Permits

Special Use Permits may be issued for certain events such as wedding ceremonies, held at the park. The Special Use Policy outlines the permitted uses and designated areas of the park where wedding ceremonies or other permitted events may be held.

Individuals or organizations interested in applying for a special use permit may first call the park at (603) 675-2175 x107, to discuss the possibility. If an applicant wishes to proceed, they must fill out the Application for a Special Use Permit and send to the park to the attention of the Chief of Visitor Services. Unless requested use is an exercise of a First Amendment right, applications must be accompanied by a non-refundable, $75 check made out to "The National Park Service."

If approved, a Special Use Permit will be sent to the applicant, along with a Hold Harmless Clause. Both must be signed and returned to the Chief of Visitor Services before the permit approval is final.

Some Permit limitations
Please remember that this is a museum and historic site and is not designed for private parties, receptions, or recreational purposes unrelated to the park's mission. A large, indoor meeting space is also not available at the park.

With weddings, only ceremonies are permitted, not receptions. Ceremonies are permitted in four specific locations at the site, see the Special Use Policy for details.

Photography
For commercial photography, both still and film, an application must be submitted in advance. You may use either the short (10-931) or long (10-932) form depending on the complexity of the project. Unless requested use is an exercise of a First Amendment right, applications must be submitted with a non-refundable, $50 check made out to "The National Park Service." Permit may require the payment of cost recovery charges, a location fee, and proof of liability insurance naming the United States as also insured.

Did You Know?

Saint-Gaudens' home as it appeared in 1885 when he first saw it.

Augustus Saint-Gaudens’ home was actually built in 1817 as an Inn. A large ball room once occupied half of the second floor. When Augustus first saw the house in 1885, he thought it dreary and forlorn.