• The Little Studio and Saint-Gaudens' home

    Saint-Gaudens

    National Historic Site New Hampshire

Curriculum Materials

Augustus Saint-Gaudens (1848-1907) was a leader in American sculpture during the Gilded Age, and helped the nation to memorialize its heroes and move forward after the Civil War. His work was inspired by the classical sculpture of ancient Greece and Rome, but he modeled it with an honesty and realism that reflected his young country's attempt to be a player on the word stage.

Provided below are curriculum items for teachers to use in their classrooms. These lessons can be enhanced by a trip to Saint-Gaudens National Historic Site in Cornish, New Hampshire, the last permanent home of Augustus Saint-Gaudens. The site preserves and celebrates the memory of Saint-Gaudens and the colony of artists that flourished in Cornish in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

Getting To Know Your National Parks: Saint-Gaudens National Historic Site
Curriculum for elementary grades

An American Sculptor: Augustus Saint-Gaudens, 1848-1907
Curriculum for grades 3-6

Augustus Saint-Gaudens and the Cornish Colony
Curriculum for grades 7-12

Teacher's Guide to film: Augustus Saint-Gaudens, Master of American Sculpture
A new, hour-long, documentary on the sculptor. The guide concentrates on three of Saint-Gaudens' monuments: Adams Memorial, Lincoln Monument and Shaw Memorial.

After using any part of the curriculum sections above, please feel free to use this evaluation form to let the park know of ways it can improve these materials for future use.




Did You Know?

Corn Flakes Box

Augustus Saint-Gaudens was one of the first people to eat corn flakes. The cereal was invented by John and Will Kellogg in 1894 and commercially produced in 1906. Saint-Gaudens corresponded with Dr. John Kellogg in his later years and was prescribed Corn Flakes as a health food.