• A section of the bowsprint and figurehead on the bow of BALCLUTHA.

    San Francisco Maritime

    National Historical Park California

Ship Shape Walk

A section of the front of the Marina Middle school in San Francisco, CA.

Marina Middle School

CAB

On October 23, 2010, Marina Middle School Physical Education Teacher Cynthia Harb, invited all students, families and teachers of the San Francisco Unified School District to walk from the Marina District to Hyde Street Pier.

An enthusiastic group had fun getting more fit with friends and family on this scenic walk (two miles roundtrip). They enjoyed free admission to the historic ships on Hyde Street Pier and the Marina Middle School Band played on the historic ferryboat Eureka.

The walk began at the intersection of Marina Boulevard and Laguna Street and along the way the walkers learned some maritime history.

Cynthia developed the idea and materials for the walk during the 2010 summer while working as a park ranger on Hyde Street Pier.

 
Teacher and Park Ranger Cynthia Harb standing on the deck of a ship at Hyde Street Pier.
Cynthia Harb, physical education teacher at Marina Middle School, created the Ship Shape Walk last summer while working as a Park Ranger on Hyde Street Pier. Cynthia has returned to her PE duties and organized the event for October 23, 2010. She returned to the pier this September with her class. Here she is standing on the deck of the ferryboat EUREKA.
Photo by Marina Middle School student
 
Group of students walking in the Fort Mason area.
Cynthia Harb leading the Ship Shape Walkers over the Fort Mason hill enroute to Hyde Street Pier.
Photo courtesy of Cynthia Harb
 
Group of students on Hyde Street Pier.
Group arrives at Hyde Street Pier.
NPS
 
High school band playing on a ferryboat.
The Marina Middle School Band playing on the car deck of the EUREKA ferryboat.
Cynthia Harb
 
A view looking north of Hyde Street Pier and the historic ships.
Hyde Street Pier
NPS

Did You Know?

The stern of the THAYER showing two rectangular-shaped openings.

Loading ports are small, watertight doors in a ship's hull that lead directly into the hold. Lumber could be more easily loaded into the hold through these ports rather than through the smaller hatches on the deck. These ports had to be caulked shut before the ship put to sea. More...