• Canoeists paddle by tree lined shores

    Saint Croix

    National Scenic Riverway WI,MN

Film & Photography Permits

Commercial Filming and Photography

The very nature of the St. Croix and Namekagon Rivers make them enticing backgrounds for filming and photography. In order to preserve and protect these resources, and to assure the enjoyment of these resources by the public, the following guidelines are established as they relate to filming and photographic activities within the National Scenic Riverway.

Generally, permits are not required for:

  • Visitors using cameras and/or recording devices for their own personal use.
  • Sound technicians, and film or video news crews at breaking news events. News media wishing to access the Riverway for entertainment or scheduled purposes may require a permit.
  • NPS filming or photography, Department of the Interior Audiovisual Center filming or filming/photography done pursuant to a cooperative agreement or contract.

Filming or photography intended for commercial public viewing or advertising, including but not limited to, commercial still photography, motion picture photography, television commercials and/or videotaping, will require a permit. To apply for a permit, complete either the still photography or the commercial filming application form and submit it to the permit coordinator. Please remember to allow sufficient time for evaluation by the park staff before the start date of the proposed activity. Also, there is a $100.00 non-refundable application fee which must accompany all applications for commercial filming and photography. If filming application is approved, additional costs may apply.

For more information on Commercial Filming and Photography; Contact permit specialist at 715-483-2261 or via email.

Did You Know?

Blackand white old photo of three men standing on logs loaded on a wagon with horses attached

In 1872 3,500 men, 1,600 horses and 250 oxen logged off 35,000 acres cutting some 200 million board feet of logs. "Taylors Falls Reporter". In 1883 the Boom in Stillwater, Minnesota, which collected logs coming down the St. Croix River, reported 1,397,417 logs for 217,045,647 board feet.