• Canoeists paddle by tree lined shores

    Saint Croix

    National Scenic Riverway WI,MN

New Chief Ranger

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Date: November 21, 2013
Contact: Julie Galonska, 715-483-2270

Mathew Jacobsen Selected as Riverway's Chief Ranger

ST. CROIX FALLS, Wisconsin: Mathew Jacobsen has been selected as the chief ranger for the St. Croix National Scenic Riverway. He will oversee the Riverway's visitor and resource protection division which encompasses law enforcement, security, emergency services, fire, ranger activities, and the park's lands program.

Jacobsen has most recently served with the U.S. Forest Service in Duluth, Minnesota, as the patrol captain for the Minnesota and Wisconsin national forests. He has been responsible for law enforcement and investigations in the Chippewa, Superior and Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forests and the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness.

In announcing the selection, Riverway Superintendent Chris Stein remarked, "Mat is a proven leader with over ten years of federal law enforcement experience. His ability to manage complex issues across large geographic areas and engage partners and communities will be assets at the Riverway. We look forward to welcoming him aboard."

A veteran of the U.S. Marine Corps, Jacobsen has also worked as a special agent in the criminal investigation division of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in Minneapolis and for the National Park Service at Fire Island National Seashore in New York and previously at the Riverway.

"Serving as the chief ranger for the Riverway is a tremendous privilege," says Jacobsen. "Having worked at the Riverway as a park ranger and district ranger, I know what a special place it is. I am excited to return and continue the ongoing efforts in making positive improvements within the division and the park."

A native of Rosemount, Minnesota, Jacobsen currently resides in Eden Prairie with his wife Heather Lang Jacobsen and one son. He has a bachelor's of science degree in education from Upper Iowa University and is a graduate of the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center.

Jacobsen will begin work at the Riverway on December 2.

Did You Know?

A very narrow insect with skinny legs and a tail

Water scorpions use their tails or siphons as a a "snorkel" thrusting it up through the surface film on the water to the air above. Their legs are not much use in swimming, so most water scorpions spend life near the shoreline.