• Canoeists paddle by tree lined shores

    Saint Croix

    National Scenic Riverway WI,MN

Fly Fishing

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Date: May 4, 2011
Contact: Dale Cox, 715-483-2272

 Free Fly Fishing Workshop at Osceola Landing

The National Park Service at the St. Croix National Scenic Riverway will host a free fly fishing workshop at Osceola Landing on Saturday, May 21, from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced angler, this is a unique opportunity to learn about basic and advanced casting techniques, as well as watershed ecology and conservation. Participants will become familiar with equipment used in freshwater fly fishing and will observe demonstrations of tying imitations of native aquatic insects, including nymphs, dry flies, and streamers. Park rangers and volunteers from the Federation of Fly Fisherswill also provide information on how stream conservation, watershed health, and a fly fishing ethic can affect the water quality of the St. Croix River.

Equipment will be available for use by workshop participants. This is a free program and no registration is required. Participants are encouraged to bring lunches and snacks. The workshop is designed for ages 13 and older. It will be canceled if there is severe weather.

Osceola Landing is located on the Minnesota side of the St. Croix River, off of Highway 243, a quarter mile west of Osceola, Wisconsin.  

For additional information on the workshop, contact Dale Cox at (715) 483-2272.

The St. Croix National Scenic Riverway was established by the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act in 1968; it is one of a group of eight rivers in the country which first received this recognition. For 255 miles, the St. Croix River and its tributary, the Namekagon, flow through some of the most scenic and least developed country in the Upper Midwest.

For additional information on the Riverway call (715) 483-2274.



Did You Know?

A green dragonfly emerges from its old skin, seen below.

Dragonflies spend most of their life living in the water. Eventually they climb out of the water and grab onto something. Here they will emerge from their old skin like a butterfly emerges from its cocoon and fly away.