• Dragonfly

    Russell Cave

    National Monument Alabama

Nature & Science

Looking out of the cave shelter

Looking out of the cave shelter

Mary Dawson

Russell Cave was declared a National Monument in 1961 because of early inhabitant's use of the cave entrance. The large opening provided shelter from inclement weather.

 
snow along the boardwalk to the cave shelter

Snow along the boardwalk to the cave shelter

Mary Dawson

The surrounding area varied over the centuries from rolling tundra to deciduous woodlands. There was wildlife to hunt, fresh flowing water, and medicinal and edible plants could be found.

 
Squirrel in front of the visitor center

Squirrel searching for food in front of the visitor center

Mary Dawson

Fast forward to the present day; look around for similarities and differences. Visitors may see wildlife; the water still flows into the cave as it did in the past but is now monitored monthly for bacteria.

 
Black-Eyed Susan in wildflower meadow

Black-Eyed Susan in wildflower meadow

Antoine Fletcher

There is a wildflower meadow, where visitors can see many medicinal and edible plants that were used by the early inhabitants. Visitors can take the trails through the deciduous woodlands that offer a vestige of primitive America, where time can be spent in thoughtful solitude.

Did You Know?

Entrance Sign

Russell Cave National Monument gets its name from Thomas Russell and his family. They owned the property when the maps of the area were made around 1835 - 1928.