• Photo of the continental divide blanketed in snow. NPS Photo by VIP Schonlau

    Rocky Mountain

    National Park Colorado

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  • Old Fall River Road will be closed in 2014 due to flood damage

    Damages on Old Fall River Road are extensive and the road will remain closed to vehicles through 2014. It is unknown at this time whether hikers and bicyclists will be allowed on the road. More »

  • Impacts from September 2013 Flood

    Due to recent flooding, there are still some closures in the park that could affect your visit. More »

Old Fall River Road In Rocky Mountain National Park To Close For The Season To Vehicles On October 10

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Date: October 3, 2012
Contact: Kyle Patterson, (970) 586-1363

Old Fall River Road in Rocky Mountain National Park will be closed to vehicles for the season on October 10, for park staff to complete maintenance on the road.  Road maintenance is scheduled to take place on October 10, 11, 12, 15, 16 and 17. In the event of good weather, clear road conditions, and the absence of road maintenance; bicycles and pets on leashes may be permitted as indicated by signs.   

The road will eventually revert to winter trail status beyond Alluvial Fan. This typically occurs in November. Old Fall River Road normally opens by the Fourth of July holiday weekend but this year, due to minimal spring snow, the road opened on June 15.          

Old Fall River Road was built between 1913 and 1920. It is an unpaved road which travels from Endovalley Picnic Area to above treeline at Fall River Pass, following the steep slope of Mount Chapin's south face. Due to the winding, narrow nature of the road, the scenic 9.4-mile route leading to Trail Ridge Road is one-way only.       

For those visitors who want to confirm the status of Old Fall River Road, please call the park's Information Office at (970) 586-1206.

Did You Know?

a photo of treeline in Rocky Mountain National Park

If the current amount of total nitrogen deposition measured at the high-elevation monitoring site in Rocky Mountain National Park (3 kg/ha/yr) was the same throughout the park, the amount of airborne nitrogen entering the park would be equivalent to 35,500 twenty-pound bags of fertilizer. More...