• Photo of golden aspen with Hallet Peak in the background. NPS Photo by J. Frank

    Rocky Mountain

    National Park Colorado

Numerous New Projects Will Soon Be Underway in RMNP

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Date: September 10, 2009
Contact: Kyle Patterson, 970-586-1368

A number of projects are underway or soon to begin in Rocky Mountain National Park. Park staff will utilize a helicopter, beginning next week, for four of these projects.  These projects include:

  • Transporting a mini-excavator into and out of the Lulu City wetlands to dig between 50 and 100 soil pits to assess the depth and particle sizes of sediments deposited by the 2003 Grand Ditch Breach
  • Importing trail tread material to the North Inlet Trail above treeline to finish a multi-year effort to reconstruct the trail from the July backcountry campsite area to near the Flattop Mountain Junction
  • Transporting materials to replace a bridge on the Little Yellowstone Trail
  • Demobilizing from the reconstruction of the patrol cabin near Chasm Lake that was destroyed by an avalanche in 2003

No trails will be closed during these projects. While the helicopter is flying over work areas, park staff may temporarily delay hikers. The Colorado River Trailhead parking area will be closed for two days during the Lulu City project for staging of materials. This project will likely occur on September 14 and September 15, weather and resources permitting. The Timber Lake Trailhead parking area across the road will remain open.

 

Hazard tree mitigation will take place near the North Inlet Trailhead the week of September 14. During the project the access road to the North Inlet Trail as well as the lower and upper parking areas will be closed.  Temporary work stoppages can occur, on occasion, to allow hikers through. However, vehicles will not be allowed.

 

The Alpine Ridge Trail, commonly referred to as Huffer Hill, across from the Alpine Visitor Center, is closed through next year for major reconstruction. By removing the old trail structure this fall, trail crews can get a head start on the reconstruction for next summer. This popular trail climbs over 200 feet, has steep grades, and provides incredible views. The condition of the trail has significantly deteriorated resulting in erosion around the log steps and unlevel stepping surfaces, contributing to safety concerns and resource impacts to the tundra.

Did You Know?

a photo of folks throwing snowballs in front of the snow-covered Alpine Visitor Center

The coldest temperature inside the Alpine Visitor Center during the winter is rarely below 20 degrees. The snow insulates the building when it is closed for the winter.