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    Rocky Mountain

    National Park Colorado

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Search Underway in Rocky Mountain National Park

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Date: September 4, 2007
Contact: Kyle Patterson, 970-586-1363

On Saturday afternoon, September 1, Terence (Terry) and Marion Jones were dropped off at the Chapin Pass Trailhead located along the Fall River Road, in the northern portion of Rocky Mountain National Park. They had a backcountry permit to stay at the Flatiron backcountry campsite located near Hague Creek that night. On Sunday, September 2, their plan was to hike north via the Cache La Poudre River Trail and Big South Trail out to the Big South Trailhead. Last night their car was located outside of the park at the Big South Trailhead on Highway 14. Their family has not heard from them since September 1.

Park rangers are working on containment and confinement of the area near the Chapin Pass Trailhead as well as the Mummy Pass Trail leading in from Corral Creek. Other backcountry campers, who were staying at sites in the same area Saturday night, are being contacted to see whether the Jones' made it to the Flatiron backcountry campsite to narrow down a point last seen for the couple. Larimer County Sheriff’s Office Emergency Services and Larimer County Search and Rescue are searching trails outside of the park in the Comanche Peak Wilderness area.

Terry is fifty-six years old and Marion is forty-nine years old. They are from Fort Collins. They do not have any pre-existing medical conditions and are experienced backpackers with gear and equipment to spend the night. They were dropped off at the trailhead by their son.

Did You Know?

a photo of Elizabeth Burnell, the nation's first female nature guide

Rocky Mountain National Park licensed the nation’s first female nature guides in 1917. Sisters Ester and Elizabeth Burnell learned the naturalist trade from advocate and author Enos Mills.