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    Rocky Mountain

    National Park Colorado

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Last Program This Saturday for the 2007 Lyceum Series

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Date: April 29, 2007
Contact: Kyle Patterson, 970-586-1363

The theme of Rocky Mountain National Park's 2007 Lyceum is Threatened and Endangered Species:  Going … Going … Saved!   Speakers have presented a variety of topics on the role of the Endangered Species Act, investigating species such as plants, invertebrates, fish, birds and mammals struggling to survive, and looking at how citizens can help through legislative efforts and actions in their own neighborhoods.  The Lyceum schedule runs through May 5, 2007.  These Saturday evening programs are held in the Beaver Meadows Visitor Center Auditorium at 7:00 p.m.  Programs are free and open to the public.

Saturday, May 5, 7:00 p.m. White-tailed Ptarmigan: Ghosts of the Alpine

White-tailed ptarmigan, camouflaged to blend into their surroundings, are the only birds capable of survival in harsh, alpine environments throughout the year. The program, given by Dr. Joyce Gellhorn and Calvin Whitehall, takes a look at the unique adaptations of ptarmigan for living under these conditions. Because this species lives on the edge, it may serve as a barometer to the health of our planet in terms of global warming and preservation of habitats. We follow white-tailed ptarmigan month by month and show where they live, what they eat, their life cycle including mating rituals, nesting, raising young, and molting patterns as they change from winter white to mottled summer plumage.

Financial support for the lyceum series is provided by the park’s nonprofit partner, the Rocky Mountain Nature Association.  For more information about Rocky Mountain National Park please call (970) 586-1206.

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