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    Rocky Mountain

    National Park Colorado

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  • Impacts from September 2013 Flood - Old Fall River Road, Alluvial Fan and Trails

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All Hazard Team Arrives At Rocky Mountain National Park

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Date: September 15, 2013
Contact: Murray Shoemaker, 970-586-1443

The Intermountain Region's All Hazard Incident Management Team arrived on 9/14 to assist the staff of Rocky Mountain National Park with the ongoing flooding. Incident Commander Mark Foust said, "The staff at Rocky Mountain has done an outstanding job of dealing with this crisis. The incident management team is here to help them coordinate incident resources and provide the support needed to meet critical objectives".


Trail Ridge Road is open from Grand Lake to Estes Park for essential travel only. Essential travel is currently defined as community residents, family members of community residents providing support, emergency services, and delivery trucks. Truck length may not exceed ninety feet. No other east bound traffic will be allowed, even for visitors with advance plans and reservations in the community. Trail Ridge is open to all travel west bound from Estes Park to Grand Lake. 
The park continues to be closed to all recreational use. Park staff asks that everyone honor these closures, especially the backcountry and trail closures. The east side of Rocky Mountain National Park is under an emergency disaster declaration. It is too soon to determine when sections of the park may reopen.  Park staff are focused on flood relief work. 

Park and incident personnel are responding to requests for assistance from the town of Estes Park and Larimer County whenever possible. 

Phone and internet service have been restored to the park. For Rocky Mountain National Park information, call the park's Information Office at 970-586-1206.  

Did You Know?

a photo of a butterfly researcher looking through binoculars

The Nerd Herd (aka research volunteers) gave more than 4,500 hours to the park in 2009. These citizen scientists help monitor the health of our resources including bears, elk, plants, hummingbirds, glaciers, and butterflies. More...