• Photo of mist drifting over Moraine Park meadow on a spring morning. NPS Photo by C. Brindle

    Rocky Mountain

    National Park Colorado

There are park alerts in effect.
hide Alerts »
  • Impacts from September 2013 Flood - Old Fall River Road, Alluvial Fan and Trails

    Select this link to learn More »

Forest Health: Other Resources

 
Photo page one Mountain Pine Beetle Brochure

Mountain Pine Beetle on the Front Range: What to Know. To download a printable pdf version of the full four-page brochure click on the image.

Mountain pine beetle damage across the Western United States is more obvious every season. As trees die, entire landscapes turn red, brown, and then gray. In Northern Colorado, the beetle epidemic is intensifying.

Will the forest survive? Yes!
Pine beetles are native to Colorado and outbreaks are a natural ecological process. The mountain pine beetle does alter forests, but it does not destroy them. Surviving small trees and seeds released from dropped cones are the sources from which our new pine forests will grow.

Land management agencies along the Front Range are working together to address the mountain pine beetle epidemic:

Rocky Mountain National Park's priorities are to remove hazard trees and hazard fuels to protect life and property. Park personnel selectively spray to protect healthy trees that provide shade, beauty and a good seed source in locations such as campgrounds, historic landscapes, picnic areas, and visitor centers.

The Arapaho and Roosevelt National Forests and Pawnee National Grassland are using both tree removal and spraying to respond to the epidemic in high value recreation areas such as campgrounds and trailheads. Workers have removed more than 3,000 hazard trees. The forest staff also continues to thin forests near communities to reduce risks associated with wildfires.

Five Front Range counties (Boulder, Clear Creek, Gilpin, Jefferson, and Larimer), the Colorado State Forest Service, and private landowners are working collaboratively to reduce the spread of MPB in parks and open space. State and county workers thin overcrowded stands and work with other land management agencies to share information and identify needs on a landscape scale.

 

For more information:

Arapaho and Roosevelt National Forests and Pawnee National Grassland Visitor Information
970-295-6700
www.fs.fed.us/r2/arnf/

U.S. Forest Service Mountain Pine Beetle Incident Management Team
www.fs.fed.us/r2/bark-beetle/index.html

Colorado State Forest Service
970-491-6303
http://csfs.colostate.edu/

Colorado State Parks
303-866-3437
http://parks.state.co.us/

Colorado State University Extension
970-491-6281
http://www.ext.colostate.edu/

Boulder County Parks and Open Space
303-678-6200
www.bouldercounty.org/openspace/

Clear Creek County
303-679-2300
www.co.clear-creek.co.us/

Gilpin County
303-582-5214
www.co.gilpin.co.us/

Jefferson County Open Space
303-271-5925
www.co.jefferson.co.us/openspace/

Larimer County Department of Natural Resources
970-679-4570
www.co.larimer.co.us/naturalresources/

Did You Know?

a photo of a coyote

Kawuneeche Valley is on the west side of the Continental Divide and channels water into the Colorado River. Kawuneeche means Coyote in Arapaho.