• Gaines' Mill battlefield -- Watt House area

    Richmond

    National Battlefield Park Virginia

Issue 8: Summer 2001 page 1

The Superintendent's Letter: Holding the High Ground
By Cynthia MacLeod

My job as superintendent allows and requires me to visit other units of the National Park System. I marvel at the beauty of the natural sites and the depth of the history of the cultural sites, and I appreciate the dedication of the men and women of the National Park Service. I am always proud to come home and compare our staff favorably with any other. Not a week goes by that I do not receive a letter or a call remarking on the excellence of the park employees and our volunteers here in Richmond, Virginia. I do know a secret of the front-line employees; that is that their jobs are some of the personally most rewarding in the National Park Service. When I have a chance to be at the front desk or on a battlefield talking with the visitors, I have some of my best days, too! The visitors to the Richmond National Battlefield Park and the Maggie L. Walker National Historic Site bring a great level of enthusiasm, if not knowledge as well to the parks. Visitors have come in good numbers to the special battlefield evening walks and talks, to book-signing lectures at Tredegar, to Maggie Walker celebrations, and to our daily regular visiting hours. We hope that we are being good stewards of your resources and providing for your enjoyment of them now and forever. I thank our volunteers who give of their time and expertise cheerfully and generously. And, I thank our employees, both front-line and behind the scenes, who reliably and expertly devote their career to the National Park Service.

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Did You Know?

Ulysses S. Grant, Union General

General Ulysses S. Grant never visited Richmond. The closest he ever came was during the battle of Fort Harrison, eight miles south of the city.