• Gaines' Mill battlefield -- Watt House area

    Richmond

    National Battlefield Park Virginia

Wildflowers

St. John's Wort

St. John's Wort, a traditional medicinal herb, growing at  Malvern Hill

(NPS photo)

Richmond National Battlefield Park presents a diverse assortment of natural resources, some more conspicuous than others. Although the park contains relatively few wildflowers the ornate blooms and bright colors of many of the park's species make them prominant displays of the park's floral diversity. In addition to being aesthetically pleasing, wildflowers are also an important part of the park ecosystem; they provide food and cover for many animals and insects, as well as adding to the biodiversity of the park's natural community.

Several common species of wildflowers are in bloom from late spring to early fall. Pink lady slipper, with its unique pink bloom, is a member of the orchid family and can be found at Cold Harbor and other units with upland forest communities. Another upland species, the black-eyed susan can be found in park fields, prairies, and open woods. Visitors near streams and wetlands may see Cardinal flowers, a favorite of hummingbirds with long red blossoms reminiscent of a Cardinal's robe. The butterfly-pea is a beautiful coastal plain flower with pale purple petals splashed with yellow and violet. It can be seen in the open forest habitat at Cold Harbor.

Since wildflowers are an important part of the park’s ecosystem, it is important to leave them in their natural habitats, undisturbed by visitors.

Did You Know?

A young woman writes a letter home for a wounded soldier.

Phoebe Yates Pember worked at Chimborazo Hospital as a matron, caring for the sick and wounded. Her memoirs, A Southern Woman’s Story are still in print and are considered to be among the finest pieces of Civil War literature.