Antietam National Battlefield

George Burgwyn Anderson

From the Peninsula to Maryland: Anderson's role in the summer of 1862

Print of George Anderson
George Anderson
Library of Congress

Quick Facts

Significance:
Confederate Brigadier General
Place of Birth:
Orange County, NC
Date of Birth
April 21, 1831
Place of Death:
Raleigh, NC
Date of Death
April 21, 1862
Place of Burial:
Raleigh, NC
Cemetery Name
Historic Oakwood Cemetery

George Anderson, commanding a brigade in D.H. Hill's division, was wounded in the hand during the Confederate assault at Malvern Hill on July 1, 1862. While recovering, he was positioned in the defenses around Richmond, Virginia and did not take part in the Northern Virginia Campaign.

Anderson was able to return to active duty and resumed command of his brigade in time for the march north into Maryland. His brigade was engaged at the Battle of South Mountain before pulling back along with the rest of D.H Hill's men to the area north of Sharpsburg, Maryland where the Army of Northern Virginia was concentrating.

During the Battle of Antietam on September 17 Anderson's veteran North Carolinians defended a portion of the Sunken Road ("Bloody Lane") against repeated Union attacks. As he led his men during the fight a minie ball struck Anderson near his ankle, injuring it badly. Anderson was pulled off the field and transported to Shepherdstown, and then by wagon up the Shenandoah Valley to Staunton, Virginia, to recuperate. From Staunton he was moved via train to Raleigh, North Carolina, where he died on October 16 following surgery to amputate what had by that point become a badly infected foot.

He was among six generals to be killed or mortally wounded on the field of Antietam.